Posts Tagged ‘The Fullbright Company’

Everybody’s Gone To The Singularity: 15 Mins Of Tacoma

Oh, Tacoma [official site], where the wind comes sweeping down the nacelles. This is the next game from Gone Home folks Fullbright, and this time we’re in space, and there are people. Well, sort of. The below 15 minutes of footage from the start of the game gives a clearer picture of how this is going to work, and its similarities and dissimilarities to the cupboard-rummaging and diary-reading of Gone Home. There’s a train ride, a musical interlude, and most important of all, SPACE BLANKETS.

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Tacoma “Reexamined” And Will Release In Spring 2017

We live in a post-Gone Home world, in which games like Firewatch have taken the environmental storytelling of the suburban-house-wanderer and advanced upon it.

Fullbright might feel the same way: they’ve redesigned parts of their next game, Tacoma, since first unveiling it last summer, and now the spaceship-wanderer is due for release in spring 2017.

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Lost In Space: Five Minutes Of Tacoma Blast Off

Check under the Christmas Spaceduck.

Given The Fullbright Company’s background with 0451 games (its founders were behind BioShock 2’s DLC chapter Minerva’s Den), their next game going into space makes me a little uneasy. Watching five minutes of gameplay from the Gone Home folks’ spaceborne second game, Tacoma [official site], part of me is on edge waiting to hear a System Shock 2 protocol droid mutter “This place is a terrible mess” or hear a midwife’s eerie call of “I’ll tear out your spine.”

That doesn’t come, or at least not in this video. Or as far as I can tell, anyway, as two folks from Game Informer are gabbing over the top of it.

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Remember Citadel? The New Tacoma Trailer Does

Tacoma [official site] – AKA wot the Gone Home studio are doing right now – isn’t necessarily channeling System Shock or 2001, but a short new trailer revealed during the Microsoft E3 conference suggests there’s something a little bit off about the AI on board the titular station. Steve Gaynor presented live onstage at the conference and spoke about how Gone Home had explored the familiar and Fullbright were now trying to show life in an unfamiliar place. His words seemed appropriate to his own situation as he stood in the echo chamber of whooping and hollering*. META.

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Have You Played… Gone Home?

A cardboard child

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Gone Home opens as Kaitlin Greenbriar returns to her family after spending a year abroad, but rather than a welcome party she finds a curiously empty house and a missing sister.

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You Can Go Home Again: Fullbright Talk Tacoma

Earlier this month, Gone Home developers Fullbright dropped a trailer for their follow-up, Tacoma. It’s set on a space station! People talk to each other! The gravity ain’t all there! There’s a toilet! And, er, that’s about all we found out. So let’s find out some more, by talking to Fullbright’s Steve Gaynor. Discussed: micro-gravity, Demolition Man, Chris Hadfield, being ‘socially conscious’ devs, accidental BioShock inspirations, what of Gone Home can and can’t work in a fantastical setting, System Shock, locked doors and whether Tacoma is more or less not-a-game than Gone Home was or wasn’t.
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Fullbright: Tacoma’s BioShock Similarities “Not Deliberate”

Gone Home developers Fullbright have shed a little more light on their so-far cryptic follow-up, Tacoma. The space station-set exploration title is due for release in 2016, but gave away little in its announcement trailer. In a forthcoming interview with RPS, Fullbright’s Steve Gaynor revealed that “you can tell from the teaser that it’s in micro-gravity; stuff is floating around. And some of the implications that has for the relationship that the player can have to the space that you’re exploring, that you couldn’t have in a terrestrial setting, is really exciting to us.”
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