Posts Tagged ‘The Sunday Papers’

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for mourning your phone, which fell in water and died a terrible death. Goodbye, Nexus 5. I guess we can roundup some of the week’s best writing about games, even if we can’t read any of it under the covers in bed anymore.

At Gamasutra, Simon Parkin writes about ageism in the games industry, including interviews with Raph Kosters and others on their experiences.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for writing The Sunday Papers because Graham is supposed to be chillaxing on holiday but he keeps popping into work so if I don’t do this he probably will. Go eat an ice lolly on the beach, Graham. Perhaps read a selection of good games writing from around the web this week.

Picking up the thread from his old A People’s History of the First-Person Shooter series on RPS, Robert Yang writes a people’s history of the “prop hunt” genre. He traces a path from CrateDM (whose readme file I too adore) to the modern-day Prey. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for chilling with your kid and wondering what you’re going to watch on weekends when the football season comes to its imminent end. Hmm. At least we’ll always be able to link to good articles about videogames.

The Guardian have been running a series of articles this week on games and motherhood. I loved this article by Keza MacDonald on how to play videogames after having a baby, which is, as a parent of a 13-month-old, I can confirm full of myth-busting common sense. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Last Sunday was for Sundaying extra hard because it was a bank holiday weekend in the UK, and that turns Sunday into even more of a holiday than normal. But this is just a regular Sunday. That means we get to round up some of the week’s (and last week’s) best writing about videogames.

At Eurogamer, Edwin Evans-Thirlwell wrote about NASA’s efforts in video game development. I like NASA, but I like that Edwin picks at the issues with their intent with games. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for childcare and comment moderation, sometimes more so than they’re for rounding up a weekworth of good videogames writing. Sometimes. This weekend we return to distract you from long weekend with some more good reads. Let’s be quick.

At Eurogamer, our own Alex Wiltshire writes about Mass Effect Andromeda and the quest for great facial animation. Interesting details from interviews with animators in this. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for recuperating after three days of seeing people and games at Rezzed (and travelling to London with a baby). Now that we’re back home, let’s do some relaxing reading. About videogames, of course.

Jalopy is an interesting, early access road trip game set in eastern europe. It is not the kind of thing which sells huge numbers of copies, but that doesn’t stop people expecting the moon. Here’s the developer explaining calmly why the moon is not possible. It is important to remember these things. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for doing something nice for your mother, if you can. Let’s hope they like curated collections of the week’s best videogame writing.

Robert Yang has written before about the need to claim VR for interesting, experimental voices and to shield it from the garbage parts of mainstream gamer culture. Here’s his manifesto on how to do it, which is excellent: Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for visiting family in Scotland after far too long. Let’s round up some good games writing before we fly.

The world continues to write about the new Zelda and I continue to not own the new Zelda. Injustices. Here’s Alex Wiltshire at Eurogamer on why Breath of the Wild is a game for the Minecraft generation. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for being ill or for looking after family who are ill. So it has been for weeks now, so I am told it will be for years to come, until my kid develops an immune system and ceases to be a malevalent petri dish. Quick, let’s gather some links to the week’s best games writing before the germs make it impossible.

Brie Code has written another thoughtful article about broadening the intent and audience of games. This time, she writes about why games should try designing for different stress responses in order to appeal to people who love or experience different things than adrenaline. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for resisting the urge to impulsively buy a Nintendo Switch and the new Zelda, or Horizon: Zero Dawn, both experiences that I would, no matter how enjoyable, likely only play for six hours before getting distracted or busy by other things. Let’s distract ourselves by rounding up some of the week’s best writing about videogames, in which I steadfastly share no Zelda reviews.

At Waypoint, Yussef Cole and Tanya DePass write that black skin is still a radical concept in videogames, drawing parallels to the representation of black people in other mediums throughout history.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for making lists of the best games writing of the week, despite evidence to the contrary presented on the two previous Sundays. Those particular Sundays were for being on holiday and sick at the same time.

I’ve been following Ooblets on Twitter for months and so has everyone else. Gamasutra looked into why by talking to the developers about their GIF-first development process.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for seeing friends and helping friends see the wacky island you live on. Quick, let’s run through some of the weeks and not-this-week’s best games writing.

At The Guardian, developer Rami Ismail wrote about the US travel ban and that, as a Muslim videogame developer, he no longer feels the US is open for business. A lot of developers are going to be effected with GDC just around the corner.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for encouraging your baby to crawl while with every extra inch shuffled across also thinking, “Oh god no he’s going to be crawling soon.” Sundays might be for removing everything below knee height and working out what to do with all the wires in the front of the TV cabinet.

Robert Yang wrote about how pylons are his penis, which is a great way to get people to read an article about the phenomenology of building Offworld Trading Company.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for cooking something new. What new recipes should we attempt together? Read the week’s best games writing and then let loose your suggestions in the comments below.

This was linked in the comments last week, but you might not read those, so: a developer at Kotaku wrote about how they accidentally made a racist videogame. A straightforward argument for the benefits of diversity.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for baking something. Inspired by one of the articles below, maybe donuts? Find out which article by reading on through a roundup of some of the best articles of the week.

At Eurogamer, Chris Bratt has started a new video series called Here’s A Thing, which highlights small, interesting details and facts about games. The second episode, linked here, is about why the creation of each new Civilization game is led by a different designer.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for visiting friends and beaches, and for in between catching up on some of the best games writing we missed during the Chrimble break. Onwards 2017.

I read a lot of articles which limply connect games to some personal trauma, but this Kotaku article by Coberly about the death of his father and the Civilization IV saves he left behind is worth reading.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for stuffing your face with roast potatoes and other related foods. Before we’re bloated to the point of being unable to move, here’s a roundup of the week best writing about games.

Game developer Katharine Neil writes about how we design games now and why. This is about the concepts of self-conscious vs. unself-conscious design, or design via theory vs. design via making, and about why the industry should do more to establish tools and language to support theory. I do not agree with everything within, and I feel like it does not make its case strongly enough in some places, but it is interesting and about humans and you should read it.

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