Posts Tagged ‘The Sunday Papers’

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for having a long lie, which used to mean staying in bed for as long as you wanted but now means staying into maybe 9am. It is genuinely a much greater luxury now, where there is greater contrast. But I suppose Sundays are also for catching up with the week’s writing about videogames.

We gave this its own post earlier in the week, but maybe you missed Julian Benson’s deep dive into the troubled development of Star Citizen. It’s maybe not as juicy as you’re expecting, but still an interesting (if long) read:

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for I-don’t-know-what. We haven’t decided yet, but we’re going to go outside and I hope I eat a nice sandwich.

Simon Roth spoke this past week about the changes to Steam reviews, but he also wrote about decisions he made (or didn’t make) with his game Maia and how they made development longer than it might have been.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for trying to go out for a Sunday lunch with a six-month-old in tow. Will we snaffle the roast potatoes quickly enough? Will he explode? It’s worth the risk.

Failbetter founder (and therefore former Sunless Sea writer/designer) Alexis Kennedy has been blogging a lot recently. He wrote this past week about No Man’s Sky and how easy it is, from his own experience on that aforementioned game, to mention features in public that then don’t end up present in the game itself. And how easy it is for the audience to find that out. There’s blockquote below, but I also like this: “IT HAS NEVER BEEN EASIER TO FIND OUT EXACTLY WHAT A GAME IS LIKE ON LAUNCH DAY, AND IF YOU HAVE ANY DOUBTS, YOU CAN WAIT A WEEK AND YOU CAN BE ABSOLUTELY SURE.”

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for being too tired to do anything. Lie down, everyone.

At Eurogamer, Jake Tucker wrote about the “fall and plummet” of APB, Dave Jones GTA-but-an-MMO that was pack of social features and cool tech and felt awful to play. Although a worrying portion of the article quotes an anonymous (and unverifiable) comment on RPS, it’s still a good read if you’re unfamiliar with the game and its brief release.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for the same thing as every other Sunday. That’s not so bad. Let’s begin the traditions by rounding up the week’s best writing about videogames.

Apparently some people are living in vans and making videogames while travelling around. This is interesting, though these stories (person does X and makes games) are going to gradually become plentiful as a natural side effect to more people making games. Good lede:

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for trying to make a baby laugh by blowing raspberries, dancing, putting your face close to his, etc. Baby will not laugh at the week’s best games writing so let’s get moving.

David Gaider is a writer and game designer at BioWare. He wrote this past week an article titled “I Want to Write Video Games”, targeted at people who might say such a thing.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for sleeping. One of the days has to be for sleeping, right? Eventually there will be sleep and Sunday seems good.

I gave this its own post earlier in the week, but let’s start with Vice’s write-up of Tibia’s locked door, which requires you to be level 999 to enter and only one player has ever passed through.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for, I hope, rolling around on the living room floor with the kid and watching the olympics out of the corner of your eye. Let’s spend Friday rounding up the week’s best writing about videogames to increase the chances of that happening. A short this one this week, not because I’m rushed but because I didn’t read much I liked this week and I hate padding this out.

At Paste, Leif Johnson writes about the unintended educational potential of Civilization VI:

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for, I hope, getting out the house and doing something recharging. Fridays are for writing a roundup of the week’s best writing about games.

Quadrilateral Cowboy was not all I hoped it would be, but it’s still a good and fascinating game. This Q&A at Gamasutra talks about the game’s development:

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for exploring – not to discover Pokémon, but for the pure pleasure of going for a walk and seeing new things. Let’s first catch the week’s best writing about videogames.

A lot, a lot, a lot has been written about Pokémon Go over the past week. I haven’t read most of it, but did enjoy Austin Walker’s simple take at his new home at Vice: Pokémon GO isn’t very good but will be huge anyway.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for continually trying to acclimatise to living in a new place after more than a decade in the same city. Did you know that things are different here? And that they’re not the same as where I was before? It’s very difficult. Probably best to lower myself into my favourite chair and first round up the week’s best writing about games.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays for hoping the weather is good so you can get out of the house, and for looking forward to the following weekend when you might have internet at home and therefore something to do when the weather is bad. In the meantime, let’s make the most of a borrowed connection and line up some of the best recent writing about videogames.

To start, sometime RPS writer Konstantinos Dimopoulos sent in his recent article on implying size and complexity when creating cities in games without the budget to show every backalley.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for packing up your house in preparation for a move while being quietly grateful that you’ve moved so many times that you’ve whittled down your belongings to the essentials. Let’s put down the boxes for a second and find the week’s best games writing before it’s too late.

At Paste, Cameron Kunzelman writes about Jeff Vogel, cantankerous and focused developer of old-fashioned isometric RPGs.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for doing what you didn’t have time for last weekend and writing a roundup of the week’s finest writing about videogames.

Cliff Harris has been re-balancing Democracy 3, a three year old game, and takes the opportunity to talk not just about those rebalances but the risks and motivations for making them in the first place.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for recovering after a long journey in a cramped car with a small baby. Sundays are for working out which of your possessions you can trick someone into taking off your hands.

Frank Cifaldi is Head of Restoration at Digital Eclipse. Tom Bennet interviewed him recently about the practice, challenges and value of remastering old games.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for baby baby baby bab– No, let’s not do that every week. Let’s instead commit to doing things at the same time as baby, like a multi-tasking wunderparent. It’s the only way to survive.

Let’s start by rounding up the week’s best videogame writing while baby is strapped to chest.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for baby baby baby baby bab–

Fridays are for preparing a collection of the week’s (and then some) best games writing. Since I haven’t been around for the past month, some of these articles are a little older than normal.

At Sub-Q – an “interactive magazine for interactive fiction” – A. Johanna DeNiro looks at the work of a forgotten, maybe-bad, maybe-great IF creator, Rybread Celsius.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Hey gang! Graham’s been off performing meiosis or whatever it is parents do (???), so you may have noticed an absence of Sunday Papers lately. Now, I firmly believe that free Sundays are for climbing hills, exploring forests, and being in/around water, but a dicky hip after a day round Loch Lomond means I must go easy today. Being Graham can’t be too difficult. First question: how is his paper-reading chair still warm? Ick.

Emily Short writes about “waypoint narrative structures” – nonlinear conversation and narrative beyond simple branching with points and ideas connected by waypoints:

Read the rest of this entry »