Posts Tagged ‘The Vanishing Of Ethan Carter’

The Re-Vanishing Of Ethan Carter: Redux Is Out

I think this is from the Redux?

John was jolly pleased with The Vanishing of Ethan Carter [official site], enjoying its pretty puzzle-solving but damning its backtracking and lack of saves. Well, many wonky bits are now better and some already-nice parts too, as developers The Astronauts have released a big free remaster update.

The Vanishing of Ethan Redux is technically a separate game, not an update, bumped up from Unreal Engine 3 and remade in Unreal Engine 4. The new version brings a new save system, faster loading of the world, visual tweaks, and more. It’s out now free for everyone who owns the game on Steam and GOG.

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People Can Fly Flies Again, Still Owns Bulletstorm

a person who can fly top right, albeit unwillingly

Polish studio People Can Fly made well-received OTT shooters Painkiller and Bulletstorm, then they got bought by Epic and became Epic Games Poland, and now suddenly they’re independent and are People Can Fly again. I’m genuinely distressed that they didn’t take the opportunity to name themselves People Can Fly Again. No cast-iron reason has been given for the regained independence and there is, as yet, no sign of conflict, but the official line is that it’s “to reflect the team’s desire to create their own games.” PCF confirm to us that they retain the rights to Bulletstorm, but sadly there’s no talk of a sequel as yet.
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Wins For Braben, Mordor And Alien: BAFTA Game Awards

Last night, BAFTA gathered in London to dish out sinister metal masks to a chosen few gamesfolk who had been found worthy of such an honour. I tend to be dismissive of Awards Shows, unless something that I really like wins a tiny trophy – then I’m quite happy and momentarily convinced that the world is just and right. It happened with Cave Johnson at this year’s Academy Awards (I’m ambivalent about Birdman) and at the 2015 BAFTA Game Awards it happened with…Destiny as best game? Oh no. Full results below.

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How Green Is My Uncanny Valley

I'm willing to admit this might be a niche issue to have

I have The Vanishing Of Ethan Carter installed on my PC and ready to go. But there’s something that’s been playing on my mind regarding that game before I’ve even booted it up. It’s been nagging at me ever since I watched a video from Andy Kelly’s Other Places series – the one which focuses on Ethan Carter’s Red Creek Valley – and it finally crystallised a problem I’ve been experiencing for years without being able to put it into words.

Just after a shot of a dam there’s a lingering shot of a churchyard. In the foreground a handless statue of Jesus marks the grave of a woman named Thusnelda. In the background the autumn trees sway in the breeze and the weed-infested grass – well, I want to say that it sways but it’s a sway which comes via a clump-by-clump waggle. That grass is why I’m proposing there exists a foliage version of the uncanny valley.

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Field Notes: How Devs Recreate Wilderness In Games

Most survival games are set in the great outdoors, and while The Vanishing of Ethan Carter and Firewatch aren’t survival games, both have taken interesting steps to present natural wilderness. We asked Mitch Bowman to find out more.

The outward appearance of everything on Earth that wasn’t made by humans is one big accident. It’s the result of a bewilderingly complicated system of interactions between organisms that couldn’t care less how pretty their surroundings are, and the end result isa chaotic mess.

As you might imagine, that makes it pretty tough for environment artists to recreate the corners of the planet that humans haven’t messed with. We understand cities – we know what they’re for, we know why they were designed the way they were, and we probably even have some idea how they were built. Not so with the great outdoors, and that presents an interesting challenge to those attempting to emulate wildernesses in video games.

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Wot I Think: The Vanishing of Ethan Carter

The Vanishing Of Ethan Carter, the first game from The Astronauts, offers a strikingly beautiful haunting journey exploring the mystery of the disappearance of a young boy. From the developers who brought us Bulletstorm (when they were People Can Fly), it couldn’t be a more different game. Here’s wot I think:

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The Great Prosperini, PI: The Vanishing Of Ethan Carter

On rails.

Private investigator seems a noble, or perhaps unambitious, career for a magic man. Possessing supernatural powers of precognition, Paul Prospero (he even has a great magician name!) decided to become a detective rather than e.g. a Strike It Lucky winner. No, instead he’s out poking around forests looking for a missing child in The Vanishing of Ethan Carter.

13 minutes of first-person mystery-solving gameplay are on this here Internet for your eyes to see in a new trailer from developers The Astronauts. The former Bulletstorm folks have also announced they’ll launch the game on September 25.

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