Posts Tagged ‘Tim-Schafer’

Psychonauts 2 Backers Can Be Investors, Says Regulator

Many backers who funded Psychonauts 2 on the crowdfunding site Fig are now considered ‘investors’, says a US regulatory body, paving the way for them to get a return in real money if the game sells well. Fig is a video games-focused fundraising site partly founded by a bunch of veteran developers including Brian Fargo and Tim Schafer. It lets you throw some quids into a project as a punter – just like Kickstarter – but also lets people invest in it. As well as welcoming serious accredited investors, it hoped to let any old mug invest by giving $1,000 or more at an ‘investor’ level – but the US Securities and Exchange Commission needed to have the final say on letting anyone have a crack. Now they have, and they’ve approved the whole thing. What does this mean? Can you invest in the next big project? More importantly: should you?

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Psychonauts 2’s Crowdfunding Has Ended

Psychonauts 2 was launched into crowdfunding on December 4th then hit its target on January 6th, and the campaign has now come to an end. The crowdfunding was run through FIG, a service Double Fine head Tim Schafer advises on, and received $3,829,024 against an initial goal of $3.3 million.

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Psychonauts 2! Double Fine Crowdfunding A Sequel

Remember back in 2012 when Notch was like, “I could fund a Psychonauts 2!” and Double Fine were all, “Cool! $18m please!” and Notch was all, “Shiiiit, I was thinking more 25p, and – wow, look, an octopus on a tricycle!”? Well, that’s all history now.

Double Fine are looking to make Psychonauts 2. They’re after $3.3m from backers, alongside their own investment, plus external funding from a mysterious, possibly legal party. More Psychonauts! There’s a trailer too, of sorts.

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Wot I Think: Broken Age Act 2

Over a year since the first act was belatedly released, Double Fine’s seminal Kickstarter project Broken Age is now complete. Act 1 was bursting with potential, if a somewhat flawed PC adventure. Obviously this review is of the second half of a game, so will contain some light spoilers for the core plot (but avoids most). Can it live up to the potential it suggested in its first half? Here’s wot I think:

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18-Part Double Fine Documentary Goes Free

Depending on who you ask, the first Double Fine Kickstarter was for an underwhelming adventure game which snaffled up far more money than it needed, or it was for a fascinating warts and all insight into the making of a high profile videogame which at the very least tried to reach for the stars. I’m not sure either stance is particularly accurate – i.e. given the aesthetic quality of the game it’s not at all hard to see how the money got legitimately spent, but equally Broken Age wasn’t the grand point’n’click comeback we’d hoped for – but there’s no question that the extensive and human Making Of documentary series also provided to backers sweetened the deal enormously.

And now the rest of us get to watch it too, for no-pennies.
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Tim Schafer On The End Of Spacebase DF-9’s Development

Dwarf Abort-ress more like.

Last week Double Fine announced that Spacebase DF-9 development was coming to an end. The issue was that hundreds of features that had previously been listed as “maybe possibly” coming to the game were no longer to going to be delivered, replaced instead with the release of the game’s LUA codebase so the community could add content themselves.

People are understandably peeved. Tim Schafer has now commented on the game’s Steam discussion forum in response to some of the common questions about what happened.

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Connecting The DoTTs: Schafer Plays Day Of The Tentacle

Dave The Tentacle.

What are your personal memories of Day of the Tentacle? Mine is that for years before playing it, I thought it was called “Dave the Tentacle” because I’d only ever heard it mentioned in conversation with Scottish accents. Tim Schafer’s memories of the game are considerably more interesting. Not only does he know the name of the LucasArts adventure game, but over the course of this forty-minute video he talks about the inspirations behind the characters, the process of brainstorming the story, production details of particularly fine animations… It’s almost as if he worked on it.

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