Posts Tagged ‘Weather Factory’

Not including a tutorial in Cultist Simulator was “the most contentious decision of the whole project”

cultist-simulator

I’m still not sure if I actually like Cultist Simulator, but I’m definitely fascinated by it. For now at least, I’ve finished reading Alexis Kennedy’s marvellous in-game words, but I’m not done reading about the game, and enjoying picking over Lottie Bevan’s retrospective on the game. She’s the other half of dev team Weather Factory, and there’s one bit in particular about how she and the publishers felt uneasy about there not being a tutorial – but “Alexis was dead set against it”. Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: Cultist Simulator

cultist-simulator-review-1b

In my time with Cultist Simulator, I’ve browsed hidden book shops for arcane grimoires, sent loyal acolytes on doomed expeditions, and felled nosy investigators with poisoned tea. I’ve been reduced to begging in the street for opium money, and I’ve sacrificed followers with antique daggers in secret rites to restore my vitality. Weather Factory’s first outing is what I imagine playing solitaire with Necronomicon pages might feel like, if those pages then formed a map to the location of a much older, much more cryptic tome that made the Necronomicon look like The Very Hungry Caterpillar. Read the rest of this entry »

Cultist Simulator will be summoned on May 31st

Cultist Simulator

As someone who spends a good chunk of their time “meditating on my goal of earthly knowledge” and “studying esoteric philosophies”, I’m excited to see that digital board game Cultist Simulator will offer me the chance to do both. It’s an upcoming game from Alexis Kennedy, the former creative director at Failbetter who worked on Fallen London and Sunless Sea. Cultist Simulator starts you off living a normal humdrum life, then sends you off into a dark world of perverse rituals and unspeakable terrors. Just like games journalism, then.

As the trailer below reveals, you can delve into that world on May 31st.

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