Posts Tagged ‘World of Goo’

The 25 Best Puzzle Games Ever Made

The world’s most accurate ranking of the 25 best puzzle games ever to reach a computer. Plucking the peak of PC puzzling, we break down what makes them so special, and put them in the correct order. Read on for more time travel, rearranged tiles, hidden objects and hexed cells than you could ever want.

Read the rest of this entry »

Have You Played… World Of Goo?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

It is literally impossible that World Of Goo is from SEVEN YEARS AGO. That absolutely, categorically cannot be the case. There has simply been a malfunction in chronology. We had that world exclusive review maybe three years ago at most.

Read the rest of this entry »

!: Rock, Paper, Shotgun’s Seven Year Humble Bundle

We’re seven years old! (Actually, we were seven years old last month, but we’ve never been much for punctuality.) And so by way of celebration we’ve curated the latest weekly Humble Bundle, and that means we’ve chosen some of our most beloved indie games from the past seven years for the Pay What You Want sale. An esoteric bunch, but so very beautiful, all. If only there were room for all the delights of those many wonderful years. As ever, some of the money goes to charity, too: we chose EFF and Medecins Sans Frontieres. Find out more, below, or simply click over the the bundle itself.

Read the rest of this entry »

Steam Summer Sale Redux: All Of The Indies

And hey, only eight more where that came from.

Welp, I guess that’s it, then. We can’t escape it. The Steam Summer Sale’s returned, but honestly, can you remember a single moment before it began? Was there ever a moment before it began? Maybe we’re trapped in some infinite, Groundhog-Day-style loop of spending, obligation, and guilt. Maybe we’ll never escape. Maybe this is the least threatening eternal hell loop ever conceived. But oh well, because look at all of the savings!

Read the rest of this entry »

Juiced And Spruced: Making Better Games

Indiegames notice that Crayon Physics Deluxe developer Petri Purho and Martin Jonasson, creator of Jesus vs Dinosaurs, talked about tweening and juiciness at the Nordic Game Indie Night 2012. What’s your favourite sort of juice? Orange or mango maybe? Or more likely it’s jaunty music, uncannily large eyes that blink on impact with projectiles, and a little bit of delay and wobble. Confused? All is explained in the fifteen minute video. Purho and Jonasson have built a simple Breakout clone to which they can add layers of ‘juice’ and you can play with the program yourself.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Slightly More Humble Than Usual Bundle

that old chestnut

…Which I don’t say to demean the fine contents of the latest Humble offering, but simply because there are slightly fewer games than usual, plus it’s primarily an Android phone offering, albeit with PC/smug expensive PC/beardy defensive PC versions of the contents also available. Which is, of course, why I’m posting it. They’re calling it the most cross-platformish bundle they’ve even done. Contents this time around are:

Anomaly: Warzone Earth (reverse tower defence), Osmos (cellular absorption puzzler), and EDGE (cubist physics puzzler). Pay over the average – currently in the $10 zone – and you’ll get World of Goo too.

Read the rest of this entry »

The Very Important List Of PC Games, Part 2/5

Yesterday, as you may have noted, Dr Rossignol began our lecture series on the most important PC games of all time. Much like The Christmas Lectures, The Reith Lectures, and the TED Lectures, this definitive series has been a part of our institution as long as the Earth has borne stones. In this second part Professor John Walker explains the varying importanceness of a second collection of the most important games to have graced the PC in the last 150 years. Read on for one fifth of the elements necessary for enlightenment. And doffs of hats to Intel’s AppUp developer program for sponsoring this most critical of series.

Read the rest of this entry »