Nobunaga’s Ambition Grows With Ascension In English

Nobunaga’s Ambition: Sphere of Influence – Ascension [official site], a standalone follow-up to Koei Tecmo’s latest sim-o-strategy take on Japanese history, is now out in English. Technically it’s been on Steam since March but, y’know, it takes mighty ambition to play a game in a foreign language. Nobunaga’s Ambition is set during the Sengoku period of feudal Japan, having players duke it out for control of territory and resources – the usual war stuff. You know those historymen and their wars, they can’t get enough of ’em.

Rob Zacny wasn’t wholly into Nobunaga’s Ambition: Sphere of Influence pre-Ascension when he told us Wot He Thought, though a fair few fans did pop up to defend it. So what’s new in Ascension? One of the big additions is ‘Officer Play’, where you get to be an officer climbing the ranks. Koei Tecmo explain:

“Players will be able to select from a massive array of over 2000 diverse characters, and a number of well-known individuals offer unique events, exclusive missions and tailor-made content, with special attention given to Yukimura Sanada, the famous Japanese samurai whom many of his time heralded as the strongest warrior in Japan.”

Ascension also introduces siege battles and naval battles, as well as expanding territory management with ‘Garden Politics’.

Nobunaga’s Ambition: Sphere of Influence – Ascension is a standalone game on Steam for £39.99/47,99€/$47.99, which includes a 20% relaunch discount until November 1st. Here, this trailer explains a lot about how the game works:

From this site

4 Comments

  1. mitthrawnuruodo says:

    Rob Zacny wasn’t wholly into Nobunaga’s Ambition: Sphere of Influence pre-Ascension when he told us Wot He Thought, though a fair few fans did pop up to defend it.

    – That happened because that review was factually incorrect. He major complain was about “excessive micromanagement” in a game where micromanagement is entirely optional, and is actively discouraged by the game. Somewhat like playing a game in nightmare mode and then complaining its too hard.

    • Rich says:

      Then one might accuse the game of being bad at showing the player how to avoid micromanagement.

      • mitthrawnuruodo says:

        One might, if one skipped the ingame tutorials, did not read the manual, and ignored the game’s official marketing and gameplay videos.

        One might have played arcade strategy games like Civ or Total War, and assumed all grand strategy games play in the same way.

    • shde2e says:

      The problem I found with actively removing most of the micromanagement is that it doesn’t leave much else to do.

      At most you can get into the actual warring (which is fairly shallow itsself), but if you’re not actively fighting someone you’re mostly just clicking through the turns. Or that was my experience anyway.

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