Posts Tagged ‘The Sunday Papers’

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for checking what’s left on the house move todo list. Only a little over a week left until we abandon an non-EU tax haven island for a larger, aspiring version of the same. Let’s pack our bags with some of the week’s best writing about games.

Mark Serrels’ son is ruining his Zelda: Breath of the Wild save. This is something I recognise but have not yet precisely experienced, but all things in due course. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for… baking donuts? Yeah, let’s go with that. I’d like to learn how to bake donuts. I will do a bad job of this but the great thing about baking is that even failures are normally delicious. Much like games writing? Does that segue work?

Let’s start with: Katherine Cross wrote a requiem for Mass Effect: Andromeda. It’s a sympathetic article, and a fair encapsulation of the game’s flaws and the shitshow that followed its release. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for thinking that maybe you could set up a Twitter bot to write these introductions. Would that be a markov chain? I don’t know. Let’s round up the week’s writing about videogames while we think about it. A good selection this week.

Amr Al-Aaser writes about cyberpunk, its rise in popularity as an aesthetic, and why games which fail to acknowledge the ideas and context of the genre rob it of “humanity and complexity.” Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for… I don’t know. We can do anything, can’t we? The world is our lobster, as the saying goes. Let’s start with what we do know, and round up the week’s writing about games.

International treasure Robert Yang wrote this past week about the indiepocalypse, and his points are worth thinking about as always. I have friends who making a living from their art and I have friend who make art in their spare time, and sometimes the latter group produce more because they have non-artistic jobs that spare them from the stresses of living on the breadline. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for trying to make a videogame. I’ll be honest, that’s what they’re always for, I just don’t mention it. But they’re also for rounding up some games writing from across the week.

At Gamasutra, Bill Borman did some statistical analysis to try to discover ‘hidden gems’ within Steam. It is, by his own admission, not a perfect method, but it does turn up some interesting results. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for enjoying Father’s Day with a long lie, and relaxing even more after the prior day’s modest birthday celebrations. 32, eh? This seems a decent age to read some decent games writing:

Christian Donlan at Eurogamer writes about Sony’s E3 press conference, finding little that truly excites among its polished, melancholic worlds of violence. I felt this way about E3 as a whole, at points, and Sony’s was most guilty of it for the similarity in presentation style between games. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for visiting family and returning home from visiting family. At least we can spend the travel time catching up on some reading, perhaps of fine articles about games.

At Kotaku, Jason Schreier writes up the story of Mass Effect: Andromeda’s troubled development, based on conversations with anonymous staff who worked on the game. There’s lots of interesting stuff in here. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for mourning your phone, which fell in water and died a terrible death. Goodbye, Nexus 5. I guess we can roundup some of the week’s best writing about games, even if we can’t read any of it under the covers in bed anymore.

At Gamasutra, Simon Parkin writes about ageism in the games industry, including interviews with Raph Kosters and others on their experiences.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for writing The Sunday Papers because Graham is supposed to be chillaxing on holiday but he keeps popping into work so if I don’t do this he probably will. Go eat an ice lolly on the beach, Graham. Perhaps read a selection of good games writing from around the web this week.

Picking up the thread from his old A People’s History of the First-Person Shooter series on RPS, Robert Yang writes a people’s history of the “prop hunt” genre. He traces a path from CrateDM (whose readme file I too adore) to the modern-day Prey. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for chilling with your kid and wondering what you’re going to watch on weekends when the football season comes to its imminent end. Hmm. At least we’ll always be able to link to good articles about videogames.

The Guardian have been running a series of articles this week on games and motherhood. I loved this article by Keza MacDonald on how to play videogames after having a baby, which is, as a parent of a 13-month-old, I can confirm full of myth-busting common sense. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Last Sunday was for Sundaying extra hard because it was a bank holiday weekend in the UK, and that turns Sunday into even more of a holiday than normal. But this is just a regular Sunday. That means we get to round up some of the week’s (and last week’s) best writing about videogames.

At Eurogamer, Edwin Evans-Thirlwell wrote about NASA’s efforts in video game development. I like NASA, but I like that Edwin picks at the issues with their intent with games. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for childcare and comment moderation, sometimes more so than they’re for rounding up a weekworth of good videogames writing. Sometimes. This weekend we return to distract you from long weekend with some more good reads. Let’s be quick.

At Eurogamer, our own Alex Wiltshire writes about Mass Effect Andromeda and the quest for great facial animation. Interesting details from interviews with animators in this. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for recuperating after three days of seeing people and games at Rezzed (and travelling to London with a baby). Now that we’re back home, let’s do some relaxing reading. About videogames, of course.

Jalopy is an interesting, early access road trip game set in eastern europe. It is not the kind of thing which sells huge numbers of copies, but that doesn’t stop people expecting the moon. Here’s the developer explaining calmly why the moon is not possible. It is important to remember these things. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for doing something nice for your mother, if you can. Let’s hope they like curated collections of the week’s best videogame writing.

Robert Yang has written before about the need to claim VR for interesting, experimental voices and to shield it from the garbage parts of mainstream gamer culture. Here’s his manifesto on how to do it, which is excellent: Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for visiting family in Scotland after far too long. Let’s round up some good games writing before we fly.

The world continues to write about the new Zelda and I continue to not own the new Zelda. Injustices. Here’s Alex Wiltshire at Eurogamer on why Breath of the Wild is a game for the Minecraft generation. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for being ill or for looking after family who are ill. So it has been for weeks now, so I am told it will be for years to come, until my kid develops an immune system and ceases to be a malevalent petri dish. Quick, let’s gather some links to the week’s best games writing before the germs make it impossible.

Brie Code has written another thoughtful article about broadening the intent and audience of games. This time, she writes about why games should try designing for different stress responses in order to appeal to people who love or experience different things than adrenaline. Read the rest of this entry »

The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for resisting the urge to impulsively buy a Nintendo Switch and the new Zelda, or Horizon: Zero Dawn, both experiences that I would, no matter how enjoyable, likely only play for six hours before getting distracted or busy by other things. Let’s distract ourselves by rounding up some of the week’s best writing about videogames, in which I steadfastly share no Zelda reviews.

At Waypoint, Yussef Cole and Tanya DePass write that black skin is still a radical concept in videogames, drawing parallels to the representation of black people in other mediums throughout history.

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The Sunday Papers

Sundays are for making lists of the best games writing of the week, despite evidence to the contrary presented on the two previous Sundays. Those particular Sundays were for being on holiday and sick at the same time.

I’ve been following Ooblets on Twitter for months and so has everyone else. Gamasutra looked into why by talking to the developers about their GIF-first development process.

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