Posts Tagged ‘wot i think’

Wot I Think: Unexplored

Unexplored [Steam page] generates some of the best dungeons I’ve ever seen. On my best run so far, I forged a sword of despair and enemies trembled and fled when I pointed it in their general direction. On my most entertaining run, a Dagger of Shrieking fused itself to my hand. Every twenty seconds or so, it would scream, alerting every bastard thing in the dungeon to my presence.

So many roguelikes (and lites), so little time. What a pleasure it is, then, to find Unexplored, a new dungeon-crawler that immediately stands out from the pack, and that can be played swiftly and without too much time spent on the learning curve. It’s a wonderful game that creates my favourite procedural levels since Invisible, Inc.

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Wot I Think: Bucket Detective

How much of yourself would you sacrifice to create a literary masterpiece? Bucket Detective [official site], the new game from the creator of The Static Speaks My Name, is not interested in the answer to that question. Instead, it asks what you, in the role of forty-one year old man David Davids, will give up to write a trashy book that’s sure to get you laid. Since seeing each of the endings, the discovery of which is largely based on the answer to the question “how far will you go?”, I’ve settled on a single word that captures my feelings about Bucket Detective.

Grubby. It’s a grubby little thing, for better and for worse.

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Wot I Think: Halo Wars 2

Halo Wars 2 [official site] is undeniably a console RTS – a rare, exotic bird that looks a bit weird and could only have evolved on an island split off from the rest of the world. Removing it from its natural habitat and introducing it to the PC ecosystem, where its evolutionary niche isn’t quite so niche, might seem a little cruel and ill-conceived. But while it’s certainly not a perfect fit, it’s striking and, more often than not, quite a lot of fun. Here’s wot I think.

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Wot I Think: For Honor

There’s a scene in the History Channel’s Vikings where the protagonist, Ragnar Lothbruk, says he is “bloodsick” after a hard fought campaign. He’s maudlin, weary of everything. It’s as if he is coming down from a dark age combat high. Well, that’s sort of how For Honor leaves me feeling after a battle. Even if my team won, I’m frustrated and irritable at all the small deaths. That attack from behind by three other players. That shonky, crowded melee amid the NPC pawns. Those dozen cuts from a Samurai blade that I could have sworn I was blocking. All of it working together to leave me weary, sighing and bloodsick.
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Wot I Think: Hidden Folks

Perhaps the most important thing about Hidden Folks [official site] is how it manages to contain so much unabashed happiness. Taking the Where’s Wally concept and making it far more complex, despite being in black and white, these intricate wimmelbilderbuch art drawings (got to use it again!) burst with silly life. Click on anything and something will happen, whether it’s birds squawking and taking off, monkeys falling out of trees, boats sailing further down a river, hay bales rolling across a field, or doors opening to reveal people sitting on the toilet, each is accompanied by a man-made sound effect. Which is both daft and wonderful, which are the two words that best describe Hidden Folks. Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: Sniper Elite 4

Sniper Elite 4 [official site] is my first time with Rebellion’s World War II third-person shooter series, games I have hitherto only been peripherally aware of as ‘that one where you get to shoot Hitler in the plums’. I must admit, from afar I’d presumed this was a game about spending 80 minutes crouched on rock, gauging wind direction with a wet finger and applying mathematical levels of after-touch to each level’s single shot.

Turns out, no, it’s a halfway house between Hitman and Call of Duty – equal parts stealth and firefights. It’s entirely accessible, and that biggish number at the end of title doesn’t mean any prior knowledge is necessary either.
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