Posts Tagged ‘video’

Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Tass Times in Tonetown

By Leigh Alexander on October 1st, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

A few of you have asked about Tass Times in Tonetown, Michael and Muffy Berlyn’s 1986 love letter to weird neon new-wave. I’d never played it before, so I spent some time with it for the series, and it’s immediately evident to me why it’s so well-loved. There’s so much charming and offbeat detail within — I’d go so far as to assume that many things about Tass Times set the tone for the big adventure game boom of the late 1980s and early to mid 1990s. Perhaps you’ll see what I mean if you watch the video.

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Man-Eng – Master of Evil

By Leigh Alexander on September 24th, 2014.

I’ve been doing a series of Let’s Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that’s one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!

For the first time, I’ve got virtually nothing to tell you about the origin or creator of this week’s obscure find, Man-Eng: Master of Evil. I mean. I can tell you it has a wine river. A wine river! But otherwise, I found it in the annals of the Virtual Apple site, and all my research couldn’t turn up even a pack shot, let alone information on its creators, The Chiang Brothers.

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Hyper Light Drifter Preview Build Drifts Towards Backers

By Graham Smith on September 24th, 2014.

Hyper Light Drifter is beautiful: a stunning pixel art Zelda-like set in a magical, twinkling world full of colourful. You probably already know this. If you’re one of the 24,150 people who backed it though – earning it $645,158 on an initial goal of just $27,000 – then what you don’t yet know is how it feels to play. You might be able to correct that this weekend, as the developers have announced that the game will be available as a three-day preview build this coming weekend.

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Critical Mass

By Leigh Alexander on September 10th, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

Like Sirius Software’s Gruds in Space, the same company’s Critical Mass was one of my main childhood demons — absorbing, unsolvable, inspiring. Time is a factor in this game, and each move causes it to pass — taking planes to new places can eat up great swathes of it. When the time is up, a bomb goes off. I didn’t know exactly who I was or why I was traveling the world, fearing the great animated nuclear mushroom cloud that would eventually destroy the world if I took too long, but I loved doing it.

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Neuromancer

By Leigh Alexander on September 3rd, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

Interplay’s 1988 Neuromancer game is only very loosely based on the William Gibson novel of the same name. As it turns out, legendary acid psychologist Timothy Leary was the one who originally wanted to make a game about the book — he thought escaping into computer games might be the next psychedelic frontier.

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Mystery House

By Leigh Alexander on August 27th, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

In honor of Activision’s revival of the Sierra label, I decided to revisit the 1980 classic Mystery House, Ken and Roberta Williams’ first “Hi-Res Adventure,” and the first official game by the company that would become Sierra On-Line.

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Dream Zone

By Leigh Alexander on August 20th, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

The only thing I love as much as the sullen, radical 90s is the gaudy, late 1980s-capitalism aesthetic that sowed the seeds for it to bloom. You know, giant brick-shaped cell phones and heavy metal babes on car hoods. I think in 1989, my mother was buying me penny-saving mass-produced Marshall’s T-shirts that had neon skateboards on them, and the marquee ‘radical.’ Maybe.

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A Log Book: The Forest Diary Part One

By John Walker on August 14th, 2014.

The Forest has been doing really rather well on Steam’s Early Access this year. A survival game with an emphasis on crafting and building, and yet it’s not made out of cubes. In fact, it’s really quite impressively realistic. Apart from, maybe, the mutant horrors. I hope. Oh God, please don’t let those be realistic.

I’ve decided I’m going to master this game. I’m going to be Lord Of The Damned Woods. I’ll document my attempts, in words and video. Here’s the story of my first go.

I got my log cabin. All my life I’ve been waiting for the chance to be stranded in the woods, and have both the resources, and the wherewithal, to build a log cabin. I may have also killed a woman.

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Video: Slowly Starving To Death In Eidolon

By John Walker on August 4th, 2014.

The extremely pretty Eidolon is out now – an explore-them-up set in a future Washington that has been reclaimed by Nature. Unquestionably looking like Shelter meets Proteus, it plays differently to both, this game primarily a survival simulator. However, with no information at all, including that bit, I started playing and recorded my efforts. You can watch them below.

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The Thought Processes Of A Serial Hearthstone Loser

By Alec Meer on August 1st, 2014.

I’m pretty new to Hearthstone, Blizzard’s none-more-slick digital card game. I’ve just about clawed past the point where I’m randomly spamming stuff and hoping for the best, and now have a custom deck I’m continually tweaking and a few solid wins under my belt. Now I’m no longer facing total greenhorns, it’s a different game. I’m losing a lot. This doesn’t particularly depress me, as I know the key is learning, and I know that I’ve got a whole lot of that left to do. It’s rare for me to not run a mile at that kind of prospect, but Hearthstone’s doing a great job of pulling me back and making me battle human opponents – years-long entrenchment is slowing being eroded. I’ll probably do a few videos while I continue to learn the ropes, but let’s start with one that reveals my exact thought processes during a particularly embarrassing match, which involved an epic comeback from my opponent.
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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: The Curse of Crowley Manor

By Leigh Alexander on July 30th, 2014.

[I've been doing a series of Let's Play videos exploring old advetures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that's one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!]

In my excavations of text-based graphic adventures from the 1980s, one of my favorite discoveries has been the late Jyym Pearson’s “Apple Other-Ventures”. Each one begins with a dead-serious provocation: These are “state of the art”, with dynamically-changing, “breathtaking graphics”, “psychological realism” and “the plot quality of a fine novel.”

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Lo-Fi Let’s Play: Gruds in Space

By Leigh Alexander on July 23rd, 2014.

I’ve been doing a series of Let’s Play videos exploring old adventures, text games and lost design forms from the 1980s Apple IIe and Commodore 64 era. In a time when young men shout over new action games, I will talk softly over strange old ones. Come along on a visitation of a different era that’s one part meditations on my childhood, one part adventure game criticism, and one part preservation effort. Bonus: Everyone says the quiet talk, lo-fi handmade feel and keyboard tapping triggers ASMR responses. Please enjoy!

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The RPS Ultra Super Perfectly Coifed GaymerX Chat Show

By Nathan Grayson on July 17th, 2014.

For so many reasons (many of which I’ll elaborate on soon), GaymerX raised the bar for game conventions in my mind. I usually come away from these things drained and a little bit sad, a B.O.-scented ball of cynicism, but GaymerX actually left me energized after it came to a close on Sunday. The small San-Francisco-based con was dedicated to inclusivity and community in games, marketed foremost to the LGBTQ crowd but accepting of all (despite confusion on the latter part for some people).

To discuss what exactly made it so different, I gathered a small RPSfriend panel made up of Sentris creator Samantha Kalman, Treachery in Beatdown City master gentrification-suplexer Shawn Alexander Allen, Dominique Pamplemousse maestro Deirdra “Squinky” Kiai, and PopCap game designer Scott Jon Siegel. We talked the show’s ups and downs, queer representation in games, a bunch of games ranging from Perfect Woman to Borderlands, and heaps more. Watch below. 

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