This great Twitter account collects safe rooms in games

A new-ish Twitter account is collecting the save rooms, bases, shops, quiet zones, and other “safe rooms” from games (well, safe-ish) – places which I’m always happy to visit while playing, and glad to see pop up in my Twitter feed. The Safe Room is almost a safe room itself, a pleasant moment on that punishment of a website. Who doesn’t hear the calming Resident Evil 4 shop music when they see a screenshot, or remember Firelink Shrine as a homely hostel? Curated by Dillon Rogers, who’s currently making Gloomwood, it’s well worth a follow.

The format is simple: a place, a game, a developer, a year, and a screenshot or two. I like simple. I like accounts and bots which pop something small and enjoyable into my feed (even when they are writing horrifying video game erotica); not everything needs to be an exhaustive exploration.

Don’t

these

make

your day

better?

You’ll notice many of the rooms Rogers has chosen so far are from survival horror games – places where that moment of safety is particularly welcome. And not all of them are super-safe, some of them getting invaded, haunted, or murderised, or… but those moments wouldn’t be as powerful if the places hadn’t previously feel safe.

This reminds me of when we talked about our favourite video game apartments – places that are often safe rooms. Blade Runner’s apartment with its city-watching balcony is one of my favourites, not to mention Paul’s apartment in Deus Ex and our lair in Bloodlines. Now that I think, most of those lose their safety at some point. Apparently that’s the sort of safety I crave: fragile.

Rogers started The Safe Room in May, posting a new room every few days, and I hope he keeps at it. Give it a follow!

15 Comments

  1. gabrielonuris says:

    Not actually a “room”, more like a base, but the Mother Base in Metal Gear Solid 5 is my personal happy place now. Yesterday was my birthday, so I got that famous birthday scene when I got back. Seriously, it rolled a tear from my eye…

    Other safe places I love in games are the apartments you get in Vampire Bloodlines, the havens in the Thief series (mostly in the flawed last one, which has a haven in a clock tower), Tristram in Diablo 1 and Corvo Bianco in The Witcher 3.

    • Premium User Badge

      Mikemcn says:

      Mother base is real good, I wish there were a bit more character like the birthday scene in it though.

      In the early game play demonstrations, the sheep and things you sent there would just be walking around your main base, in the final game they’re relegated to a separate zoo area that I had trouble even finding! That was a bummer =(

      I did enjoy changing mother base to all-black as things got more dire in the game.

  2. Scurra says:

    For me, the Lighthouse in Beyond Good and Evil works similarly – it feels safe, you feel motivated to keep it safe and so…

  3. HiroTheProtagonist says:

    The dorm room in Bully is easily my favorite safe room in video games. The small trophies from past missions are a great touch, the chemistry kit is so easy to make overpowered, and the soundtrack is about as laid back as it gets.

    Also the safe rooms in Dying Light, if only because they all manage to seem cozy, even the one on top of the suspension bridge.

    • poliovaccine says:

      Bully is such a good call. I always figured I was a little biased towards it due to my prep school experience (and my outsider’s, Jimmyish relationship to the place), but all the same, your comment makes me feel validated in my super similar view haha.

      Also, I am a total sucker for making these in games like Morrowind or Fallout New Vegas. I have a mod for New Vegas which lets me turn any cell into safe storage, and it’s just a tertiary feature but I use it for that specifically (I can’t even remember which mod it is that gives me that option, it’s just offhandedly supplied in the Mod Configuration Menu). I’ll find a space I like and leave a stash there to stumble towards the next time I’m all desperate and fucked. I imagine it’s the same pleasure as dogs get out of burying bones and digging them up again months later.

      Also-also, if I had any contribution to this string of safe rooms, it would be the first apartment you get in Vampire Bloodlines. I know the LA apartment is more supposed to be your main digs, but to me the best part of that game is the first part, and that apartment was the one I bonded with the best – the LA one was too posh for my tastes or self esteem or something haha. But for real, the first time I played VTMB was as a Malkavian, and when I realized the TV was talking to me, I was so pleased I could have peed in the punch. And the fact that I could store blood packs in the fridge lent me way more of a sense of security than it ever should have, considering that I literally never used them.

  4. woodsey says:

    Both of Adam Jensen’s apartments are great, but his place in Prague in Mankind Divided especially so.

    There’s a side-mission that ends with it being broken into by some suits who are looking for you, and after 15 hours or so of going back to the apartment to check in with other characters on the TV and retrieve gear and so on, it feels like a genuinely personal attack.

    That game does not get the credit it deserves.

  5. RobbieTrout says:

    Alan Wake, the Well-Lit Room. You’ve been through an awful lot by that point, and gone through so much in the direct mission to get to the room, it’s a physical relief to make it through the door. You just go “ahhhhhh…..” and wish you could spend more time there.

  6. Wandering Taoist says:

    My most memorable of such places was the elevator in System Shock. After all the tension and near escapes and everything you find yourself suddenly in a safe place with soothing muzak. (The music is the cleverest part of it all).

  7. A Gentleman and a Taffer says:

    Blade Runner’s apartment with its city-watching balcony is one of my favourites

    Don’t forget Maggie!

  8. A Gentleman and a Taffer says:

    The Left 4 Dead 2 safe rooms are great, especially when one of your twattish team-mates keeps jamming the door when you try to close it. When you finally do, though, ahhhhhhhhhhhhh. Safe. Medkit. New gun. Reload. Ready for the next horde.

  9. Premium User Badge

    Mikemcn says:

    Assassins Creed 2 and Brotherhoods Italian Villa. (I think it was in 2?)

    It was cool having a home for Ezio where everyone was there to help you, rather than kill or at least run away from you.

    Similarly, the Witcher 3’s Corvo Bianco, it was fun seeing Geralt experience a bit of the domestic life.

  10. Turkey says:

    In the first Crusader game by Origin, you teleported back to your homebase where you could chat with your guerilla comrades and buy new weapons after each mission.

    In one of the missions near the end you find out that one of your friends was an undercover agent for the evil corporation all along. By the time you get back to base, it’s been decimated and everyone you got to know throughout the game has been killed.

    Blew my little mind way back in 95-97 or whenever that game came out.

    • Eleriel says:

      Ooooh, I remember that! it blew my mind too how they used the base in that way to increase the stakes.
      “Nowhere is safe now. You thought you were alone before? hahah! have fun!”

      I own it and the sequel on GOG, but every time I try to replay it the controls get in the way. they didn’t age very well at all.

  11. rei says:

    One that springs to mind is the little safe haven halfway down the dungeon on Bitterblack Isle in Dragon’s Dogma: Dark Arisen. The darkness in that game is so dark and that dungeon so massive that it’s a real feeling of respite.

    The elevators in the original System Shock likewise, because every other moment in the game is tense and relentless and they give you a nice little well-lit breather with happy music.

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