Posts Tagged ‘IGF Factor 2012’

The More Or Less Complete IGF Factor 2012

Aren't you glad to see this picture again?

They said it would never end. And then, on Saturday, it did. We’ve been posting our series of chats with the many splendid finalists in this year’s Independent Games Festival over the last couple of months, and, with the exception of English Country Tune (dev was worried about sounding boring), Mirage (dev didn’t reply) and Fez (dev wouldn’t confirm the possibility of a PC version) we managed to get mini-interviews with all the PC/Mac indie developers in the running for a gong.

In case you missed a few, didn’t understand what the hell it was all about or just like looking at neatly-ordered lists, here’s the complete series for your relaxed perusal. It’s a fascinating and diverse bunch of games in the finals this year, and if nothing else, it’s a rare chance to see what 18 different developers would say to the monsters in Doom if only they could talk to them.

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IGF Factor 2012: GIRP


Next up on the conveyor-belt of interviews that is our IGF Factor 2012 series, it’s the creator of GIRP. What does he have to say about the IGF, about the monsters from Doom, and about who the single most important game designer in the world is? Let’s find out.
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IGF Factor 2012: Storyteller

Today in our series of interviews with (almost) all the finalists in this year’s Independent Games Festival, it’s the turn of DIY narrative-building game Storyteller, from the creator of lovely curios Today I Die and I Wish I Were The Moon. Storyteller is nominated for the Nuovo award. Here, Ludomancy’s Daniel Benmergui talks Argentine game dev, how Storyteller creates a unique comic based upon your in-game decisions, and answers the most important question of all.
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IGF Factor 2012: At A Distance

Terry ‘VVVVVV’ Cavanagh’s ultra-minimalist, abstract first-person co-op puzzler At A Distance is nominated for the Nuovo award at this year’s Independent Games Festival. As part of our seemingly infinite series in which we chat to (almost) all the finalists, Terry talks about the concept behind the game, what he’d like to see win at the IGF this year, his disappointment that the Pirate Kart didn’t get a nod, and his answer to the most important question of all.
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IGF Factor 2012: Realm of the Mad God

Not him. Not him again. Anyone but him.

Today in our ongoing series of chats with (almost) all the PC/Mac-based Independent Games Festival 2012 finalists, it’s my personal nemesis, the micro-MMO/twin-stick shooter Realm of the Mad God – nominated for the Technical Excellence prize. Here, Wild Shadow Studios chat about their and its origins and future, getting away from boring MMO combat, and the most important question of all.
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IGF Factor 2012: Spelunky

That explosion would look so much nicer on PC, Derek

Next in our never-ending series talking to (almost) all the finalists at this year’s Independent Games Festival, it’s Derek Yu of the splendid randomly-generated cave exploring game Spelunky, which is up for the Technical Excellence, Excellence in Design and Seamus McNally Grand Prize gongs. Here, Derek chats about his origins, TIGSource, Aquaria, how he abandoned and then rejoined game development, the odds on whether we’ll see a PC version of the XBLA Spelunky remake, and his answer to the most important question of all.
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IGF Factor 2012: WAY

Today in our series of chats with (almost) all the PC and Mac-based finalists at this year’s Independent Games Festival, it’s indie collective CoCo&Co’s fascinating, dialogue-free co-op puzzle-platformer WAY. The game is nominated for the Nuovo award, and was also a winner at this year’s IGF Student Showcase. Here, the team talk about their impressive games industry origins, the concept of playing games with an anonymous partner, how games can form emotional connections with their players, breaking down the barriers that so often separate gamers who don’t speak the same language, and their answer to the most important question of all.
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