World Of Goo(d News): Euro Release Imminent

By John Walker on November 12th, 2008 at 2:56 am.

Such a pretty lady.

Updated below.

Good news, Euro-people. World of Goo is officially reaching our shores this December. Now, obviously you’re sensible enough to have bought the game directly from the 2D BOY site, so haven’t had to wait. But you might know someone silly enough to have not done that for some stupid reason, and now you can let them know the news.

2D BOY have rejiggled the deal they made with their Euro distributors, which has led to the game not only now getting a Wiiware release as well as retail for the Wii, but also getting clearance to be back up on Steam and the rest before the year is out. It’ll also be in actual real life shops (whatever they are) by the end of December. You weirdo anti-Paypal types will finally get your hands on a copy of one of 2008′s best games.

We’ve asked for details about the mysterious extra moon levels that were rumoured to be in the Euro version, but now will not be. And when we might see the cursing pack. I’ll edit them in when they let us know.

Update: Kyle explains that Chapter 6 is on hold, but that there’s interesting things going on in the World of Goo community:

“The elusive Chapter 6 is on hold, and I’m happy to say that all versions of the game will be identical and we won’t have to rush to finish extra content just to justify a price tag. If we release any additional content, we will make it available on all platforms, to all people, at the same time. No more of this “region” nonsense.

As long as we’re talking about extra content, it might be worth mentioning some of the amazing things our community has done. They have created a level editor, misc parameter editors, a tower viewer, and my favorite – an open translation project to get the game running in as many languages as possible. And it looks like they are actually creating an additional chapter all on their own. To support them, Ron and I are working to make the game more moddable. I’m curious and a little scared to see what they come up with.”

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139 Comments »

  1. Pags says:

    For a second there I thought we’d entered some sort of beautiful time-warp where World of Goo was a new game and you could buy a packet of sherbert for twopence and still have enough money left over for a matinee showing of The Wizard of Oz, and where we all had to walk 8 miles every morning just to get to school.

  2. TheSombreroKid says:

    i’m tired and read that as a manitee showing or wizard of oz, i know what one i’d pick!

  3. teo says:

    The game is old news! I want to buy the soundtrack now!

  4. Nihohit says:

    A manatee showing wizards? How wonderful!
    And by the way, when I start to build the giant tower I’m the owner of the 150,000th (more or less) highest tower in the world – does that mean that the game has sold more than 150,000 (more or less) copies?
    If so – huzzah!

  5. cliffski says:

    It probably means 150,000 people have played the game. Sadly won’t mean they all bought it :(

  6. ron carmel says:

    @john: a minor correction, there will be no wii retail release, just wiiware. the pc version will have both a digital and retail release.

    @cliffski: exactly right. last we checked the piracy rate was about 90%.

  7. Fede says:

    @ron: is piracy higher or lower compared to your expectations, 1 month after relase?

  8. Jim Rossignol says:

    last we checked the piracy rate was about 90%

    To be expected, I suppose. But still: ffs.

  9. Jelly says:

    90%? Jesus, people are jerks.

    I still commend the DRM-free release, Ron and Kyle. Thanks for a great game.

  10. Heliocentric says:

    90? Ugh… Hell, just focus on what the stardock boss said, make games for the buyers, we’ll keep you in slippers and lemsip good sir.

    I need to point out, more than one of those towers are from each copy. My 4 year old son has a new 2nd favourite game, nothing personal, but until you add goo cars my vehicual obsessed son will always choose trackmania united first.

  11. James G says:

    Owch on the 90%, last time I saw your figures it was barely anyone. I mean, jeeze, what excuses are the pirates trying to come up with for this one? Selfish arseholes they are.

  12. Thirith says:

    Things like this make me want to kick all the people who shout “Piracy isn’t killing PC gaming, so I’m not even willing to discuss this, stopping my ears now, lalala, lalala!” in the face.

    Right after kicking the 90% that pirated the game in the face. And by face I mean balls.

  13. Okami says:

    last we checked the piracy rate was about 90%

    What a shame!

  14. The Sombrero Kid says:

    i can think of a tonne of legitimate reasons why you’d pirate this game, most of them revolve around the concept that they already paid for it or are confident they are going to pay for it when it comes out in their chosen medium/country

    not to say that there isn’t a bunch of stingy cunts out there not willing to fork out a tenner for the greatest game this year

  15. Bobsy says:

    @teo:

    The soundtrack is already there in the game folder, in .ogg format. I love you 2D Boy!

  16. Optimaximal says:

    I just bought it from 2D Boy under the impression that I’d receive a code which I could plug into Steam to get that version. All I got was an .exe :(

    Still, when it comes out on Steam, I’ll buy that one too, since the game is just so fucking brilliant!

  17. Catastrophe says:

    Think i’ll be buying this for my girlfriend.

    Hurry up and release in EU dammit!

  18. Ian says:

    90% piracy on World of Goo?

    That’s absolutely shameful.

  19. Mike_Oxtynx says:

    A piracy rate of 90%? As in, 90% of the people using the game pirated it? Sorry if I seem stupid, can’t quite wrap my head around that.

  20. Mark-P says:

    ron – Could you tell us how you came to the 90% figure? It’s appalling if there’s that even half that number of people of people who are willing to behave in such a way over a game like World of Goo.
    I’m not sure whether their behaviour pisses me off more as a developer or a gamer. I can find a new job, I’m not sure if I could find a new hobby.

  21. Heliocentric says:

    The game will cost more at retail surely? Unless they *need* a box (a tempting proposition, any chance of a special edition with a mini 3d goo tower? :D) i do and will continue do download games i own when the physical media falters and download no-cd cracks whenever i get sick of the stack of long play games on my desktop leaning like a tower… (Of Goo?) but even these explanation falls short of whats happening here.

  22. Jerricho says:

    Is that based on the number of usernames against known purchases?

    I have to admit, the complete lack of any DRM on this left me feeling more inclined to pass it among friends. I love this game and have been encouraging them to play it as I know they’d love it too.

    With the pre-order I had a little code to past in and that made it more “mine” in my head. It’s such a small detail but had a signifigant effect on my view of the full release version, in that I felt less ownership at release.
    Much like the GOG downloads. I’ve bought a few of those that are replacing old abandonware downloads, something I would have previously shared freely.

    What are other people’s views on this?

    I should add that I didn’t actually copy the exe to my friends. We waited for the demo instead.

  23. cliffski says:

    “I have to admit, the complete lack of any DRM on this left me feeling more inclined to pass it among friends.”

    Thats exactly why DRM exists. Its because without it, the vast majority of people just copy games.
    90% is staggering. I’d be amazed if world of goo 2 ever made it to the PC. Why bother? just make it for consoles, or require people to be on-line to play.
    The ‘we pirate because of teh drm’ argument is so clearly now total bullshit.

  24. bobince says:

    Strangely enough PayPal decided to work for me on this one. Who can tell what their queer, random and arbitrary rules are on what card transactions to accept.

    > does that mean that the game has sold more than 150,000 (more or less) copies?

    I expect it would be 150,000 that have (a) pressed the sign that makes it connect to 2dboy’s servers for generating the clouds, and (b) glommed at least one goo onto the starting triangle to get a higher tower than zero. But presumably anyone using multiple profiles also counts extra towards the number of towers.

    I would expect pirates not to click the connect-to-internet button, but then again we’re likely to be dealing with particularly stupid pirates in this case.

    (I’d also be interested to know how the 90% was calculated before rushing to come up with explanations.)

    teo: you can also grab a few longer versions from Kyle’s page: http://kylegabler.com/oldsite/contents/music/index.html

  25. IcyBee says:

    If I had pirated this game, I probably wouldn’t have connected to the WoG server, just in case there was a unique ID in the downloaded .exe.

    The 90% figure probably only accounts for people who have pirated the game and uploaded their tower.

    :-(

  26. Heliocentric says:

    This topic is depressing, allow me to rebirth it!

    http://www.ebeanstalk.com/images/products/024-002-0-32.jpg

    BOY DON’T KNOW SHIT ABOUT PROPER GOO MANAGEMENT!

    http://www.coaster-net.com/pics/editorialsandarticles/eltoro3_brandondavis.jpg

    That’s how you do it.

  27. Jerricho says:

    @Cliffski
    I would suggest it’s not entirely bullshit. There’s a world of difference between pirating a game like Spore because of highly restrictive DRM for instance (or the fact that I was never able to play Neverwinternights expansions without a no-cd crack thanks to securom black-listing my hardware) and passing around a game like World of Goo which had only an activation code.

    In this instance the arguement holds no water at all but that does not preclude it from having signifigance elsewhere.

    So what might be more useful to look at here is the rate of piracy of the pre-orders against that of the full release and what I’d especially like to know is if the simple requirement for the code gave gamers a sufficient sense of ownership to guard it jealously rather than existing as a barrier to free distribution.

  28. itsallcrap says:

    Well, I bought it. Pre-ordered it in fact. Worth every penny.

    Premium games, on the other hand, aren’t. Pirate Spore, kids!

  29. Bhazor says:

    Not having somekind of protection actually causing more piracy? Who would have thought it?

    Reply to Cliffski

    Having second thoughts about the whole “drm free” angle?

  30. James G says:

    Oohh, just noticed the edit, that is some good news. I might just go and check some of that stuff out.

  31. qrter says:

    90% certainly is a lot, but it all depends on how 2D BOY came to that number and how that number relates to other DRM-free and DRM-full games with the same level of popularity.

    I mean, the fact still remains that we have no idea how many of those people would ever have bought the game anyway.

    If it’s based on the towers it’d be interesting to see how many of the higher towers are from pirates, indicating they’ve actually spent some time with the game.

  32. Jim Rossignol says:

    the fact still remains that we have no idea how many of those people would ever have bought the game anyway

    Who fucking cares!? Why should they get to play it for free?

  33. cliffski says:

    You tend to spend more time with a game that cost you money because you have an emotional investment in it then. I wonder how many pirates warez everything, play them all for 5 minutes and think all games are shit because they never cost them a penny.
    I’m surprised you can connect to the online score table with a pirate copy though, it would seem to be a really easy way to spoil the pirates fun.

  34. Jim Rossignol says:

    I’m surprised you can connect to the online score table with a pirate copy though, it would seem to be a really easy way to spoil the pirates fun.

    Yeah, that’s a good point. Introversion got a bunch of sales out of turning off and on the pirated Defcon key.

  35. Gap Gen says:

    Unless maybe the average player has 10 profiles?
    But yes, like cliffski says, that kind of copy protection where you limit online capabilities is pretty non-invasive, although it can be annoying when the game crashes and you can’t log back on to the server again for a while.

  36. Paul Moloney says:

    Personally, as I’d much ask pirates on their opinion of DRM as I would ask a burglar how I should lock my apartment.

    I was one of those who bought WoG off Steam in Europe; I’d presume since it was tied to a Steam account, that there _was_ the default Steam DRM involved? So presumably it’s only the direct downloadable version that has been pirated?

    P.

  37. Bhazor says:

    Just had a thought, how do we know Ron Carmel that posted here is the Ron Carmel who made the game? Why post this here and not on the website?

    Does RPS have fingerprinting or some form of rectal scanning for VIPs?

  38. Gap Gen says:

    Fact: 90% of Ron Carmels are pirated usernames.

  39. Dizet Sma says:

    “Does RPS have fingerprinting or some form of rectal scanning for VIPs?”

    I’m really hoping that’s a mis-spelling of retinal.

  40. subedii says:

    Depends on VIP preference. RPS is an equal opportunity rectal examiner.

  41. Bhazor says:

    Reply to Dizet Sma

    Well I spelt the body part right, it was just the wrong un.

  42. subedii says:

    I sincerely hope customs never make that mistake.

  43. pkt-zer0 says:

    A 90% piracy rate is pretty standard, though, isn’t it? Also, as far as I’m aware, the game didn’t get pirated before release (that means more secure than SecuROM, haha), so it’d be interesting to know how many preorders were made.

    Anyhow, the way I see it, DRM is not going to make people who didn’t want to spend money on the game suddenly go out and buy it. In which case, it’s pretty irrelevant whether you have 15,000 sales and ten times as many people playing it or the same sales but no pirates. In fact, the former case is probably more desirable, as long as you’re not spending a lot of extra cash on pirates, e.g. for tech support.

  44. Thirith says:

    Anyhow, the way I see it, DRM is not going to make people who didn’t want to spend money on the game suddenly go out and buy it. In which case, it’s pretty irrelevant whether you have 15,000 sales and ten times as many people playing it or the same sales but no pirates. In fact, the former case is probably more desirable, as long as you’re not spending a lot of extra cash on pirates, e.g. for tech support.
    I’m sorry, but that is so naive it boggles the mind. This isn’t a binary situation – 1 means you’re willing to buy the game, 0 means you’re not. Even if 50%, 25% or just 10% of the people who pirate a game might otherwise buy it, that’s tens of thousands of dollars that are lost. And realistically, the more pirated copies of a game there are, the more likely it is that a potential customer will take the game for free. At the very least it is likely that there’s a correlation between lost sales and pirated copies in circulation.

  45. Kyle Gabler says:

    We arrived at the 90% figure by looking at unique ip’s that have contacted our leaderboard server for any reason, at least once. So, this should rule out “multiple profiles per computer”. Of course, there is a lot of opportunity for error, like ip’s that change, playing at work/home/wherever, multiple copies being played from the same ip, etc, but it seems like a good enough fast and decent estimate. Then we divided that number into the total number of PC copies sold, giving us the percentage.

    This was a week or two ago, before we released the Mac version. I’m curious to find out if Mac users are more or less piraty! I’m guessing less?

    Unfortunately, I hear the 90% piracy rate isn’t all that uncommon, even (especially?) for games with DRM. I know it sounds like a gruesome number, but we like to tell ourselves “those people wouldn’t have bought it anyway”. The good news is, some have mailed us, telling us they bought the game because they first pirated it and liked it. Hurray for (some) humanity!

    Even though our game is widely pirated, I still maintain that DRM is a useless symbolic gesture, like taking your shoes off at the airport and crawling under your desk when a bomb is about to go off.

    I’m just happy people actually want to play our game at all!

  46. cliffski says:

    Well said. Its about time people stopped making silly excuses for why piracy is ok. It just plain isn’t. a 90% piracy rate is just killing PC gaming. Even if you are a starving gamer who only buys one PC game a year, you should hate piracy, because your choice of new PC games, whether you pay for them or not is shrinking all the time.

  47. bobince says:

    90% piracy may well be pretty standard, but because piracy is essentially untrackable, all previous stats have been generated using Number Out Of Arse Pulling Technology 2.0.

    The comments are assuming that the pirates are being detected connecting to World Of Goo Corp or Leaderboard, but how would that even work? Surely a copy of the game is a copy of the game… unless 2Dboy themselves have been uploading the torrents, with a special version of the game that tells the server “hello, I am pirated”.

    Anyway. Great news on the Moon. 2Dboy continue to treat us proper instead of screwing us about with marketing confusion — yay!

  48. bobince says:

    > We arrived at the 90% figure by looking at unique IPs

    Ah! Yes. As acknowledged, that *is* pretty unreliable. Probably the dynamic IP is the most severe issue there — like many DSL users, I get a new IP from my ISP every day, so I’m probably accounting for a lot of pirates there already!

  49. Paul Moloney says:

    Kyle:

    “Of course, there is a lot of opportunity for error, like ip’s that change”

    I know many Internet providers do not provide static IP addresses (mine – UPC Ireland – doesn’t anyway), so this means there is indeed huge scope for error in your figures. Hopefully *touch wood* your piracy figures are over-estimated accordingly.

    Here’s the thing; I think it is easier for people to pirate stuff if it is either (a) from an Anonymous Corporation ™ or (b) from someone you perceive as already wealthy (Ms. Spears, for example).

    If I was selling a game like World of Goo, I’d make sure to add personal details of myself to the web site, or even the game – say, a photo and bio in the About page (or equivalent thereof).

    I’d also take my fight to the torrents themselves. There’s not that many of these sites, so I’d go to the comments page of the torrent itself and post there, asking people not to torrent the game or, if they have and like it, to buy it. Point out the piracy figures, point out the fact that if everyone pirated it without buying it, there wouldn’t be any more cool games. Send a message to the uploader of the torrent likewise. Sure, there are bastards who will laugh at you, but you’ll probably get some who will succumb into basic human decency.

    That’s all carrot of course, sticks are appropriate too. One idea I had would be a peer-2-peer program that could be run by PC users in the background that would ping-attack torrent sites. I presume they would have absolute no legal comeback?

    P.

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