Posts Tagged ‘interactive-fiction’

Killing Time At Lightspeed’s Enhanced Edition Out Now

Killing Time at Lightspeed [official site] is a quirky interactive fiction-type adventure game that was created for last year’s sci-fi anthology-inspired Antholojam. It’s…it’s hard to explain. Ostensibly, it’s a game about travelling on a spaceship where your only means of interaction with home is via social media. But the further you travel from earth, the longer the delay is between your messages – to the point where refreshing your homepage skips years at a time. Holding a mirror to modern culture, then, the game often dives into some pretty dark and somber themes as you uncover snippets of life in uncertain times. “Just how much can you affect other people’s lives with your fleeting interactions through social media?” asks the game’s blurb.

The game’s Enhanced Edition has just landed on Steam if you’re keen to find out.

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IF Only: Text Adventures For People Who Hate Guessing The Verb

Emily Short is one of the world’s leading gurus on Interactive Fiction. We’re delighted to tell you that IF Only will be a regular column about the myriad world of IF gaming.

Back in the late 90s, the name “interactive fiction” was applied mostly to parser-based text adventures descended from Zork, where all output was in text and the player had to type commands to proceed. The genre has opened up enormously in recent years, with Twine and other choice-based fiction now often included in IF competitions and databases, and with some players and journalists applying the term “interactive fiction” even to graphical games with 3D environments if they have enough of a focus on story. Contrary to common report, though, this doesn’t mean that text adventures have either gone away or stopped innovating.

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Have You Played… 9:05?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

The phone rings.

Oh, no — how long have you been asleep? Sure, it was a tough night, but… This is bad. This is very bad.

The phone rings.

9:05 [official site] is a text adventure about being late for work. When you finish playing it, you’ll almost definitely tell the next person you meet to play it immediately, even if that person is a stranger at a bus stop.

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Have You Played… Aisle?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Aisle is one of my favourite games. It’s a snapshot of a life in progress that unfolds into a complex character study that you can guide toward tragedy, farce, drama, thriller or romance. The confines within which it operates – a text adventure in which a single action can be taken on each playthrough – are as strict as any I can think of, but from the restrictions of that stage it gestures toward distant cities and a storehouse of memories. You should take some time to play it right now.

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Boo: The Uncle Who Works At Nintendo

Michael Lutz made My Father’s Long, Long Legs, which just so happens to be one of my favourite Twine games, and his latest release is right up in the top ten as well. The Uncle Who Works At Nintendo is a horror game that plays on schoolground jealousies, feelings of inadequacy and experimental Nintendo hardware. There are multiple endings, some of which aren’t quite as alarming as others, and the whole story takes place in the few hours leading up to midnight during a sleepover. Best played with headphones on, although sound is atmospheric rather than intended to startle in screamer fashion.

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Freeware Garden: [R]espawn

That's [R] not R.

Javy Gwaltney, the person responsible for both You Were Made For Loneliness and the (commercial) The Terror Aboard The Speedwell, has returned to his post-cataclysmic science fiction universe with a new Twine-powered text adventure: [R]espawn. A freeware sequel to those games that can perfectly well stand on its own.

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