Superhop Superhop Superhop Superhop: Froggy

By Alice O'Connor on October 24th, 2014.

You cannot win. I am FROGGY!

It seems grossly unprofessional to open a post with a huge chunk of a game’s marketing fluff but:

FROGGY is the legendary froggame that forever changed frogtelling in the frogindustry with its groundbreaking narrative. Many critics have heralded it as the Citizen Kane of frogs. FROGGY’s most notable achievement was the accurate representation of frogs, for which it won many frogminations in froggytainment, and PC Frogger’s Frog of the Year award.

Froggy is a fizzing little curio that’s more Superhot than Frogger, a weird and wonderful free game with charm gushing out its cloaca. Come see.

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Freeware Garden: Line Crossing

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 24th, 2014.

Trains with trees. What will they think of next?

Afra, the wonderfully pixelated protagonist of Line Crossing, has found herself on a mysterious train. One I’d also have absolutely no qualms calling beautiful.

What’s more, Afra has simultaneously found herself starring in a very simple adventure game (of sorts) that seems to prefer focusing on exploration than more traditional puzzles. It starts when day suddenly turns into night. Now you have to help her go through the train and run into a menagerie of wonderfully weird creatures, situations and images.

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Signal And Noise: British Science Museum’s Transmission

By Ben Barrett on October 24th, 2014.

Transmission is a puzzle game created by the British Science Museum to teach people about the various methods of electronic communication used throughout history. It’s educational, which means it’s for kids, and because it’s a dumb science game for kids, it’s okay that I got so insultingly stuck, repeatedly even with all the multiple routes and optional objectives. I’m not the target audience, see. I’ve got work to do and no you suck.

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Fairy Bloom Ultra Encore Released & Some Freesia Logic

By Ben Barrett on October 24th, 2014.

Ah, understandable naming conventions, may you never spread to the shores of Japan. Fairy Bloom is a freeware Japanese indie game from 2005 about defending a giant plant from evil red versions of yourself. All the fun of a button-mashing action platformer without any of that payment-requiring plot, progression or 3rd dimension. It’s alright and still available if you’re into that.

Fairy Bloom Freesia was released in 2012, taking the basic concepts of Fairy Bloom, particularly that enemies could be hit into each other, and adding to it. It removed the plant and made your character the target, adding a block button and more complex play area as well as unlocks and more complex combos. The newly released Ultra Encore strips all that away again, being an HD version of the original game. The right direction? Well, no.

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Survive With A Society In Primitives

By Ben Barrett on October 23rd, 2014.

Well done, traveller, you’ve almost made it to the end of survival week. And you’re still capable of rational thought and reading! Truly you are an immortal of our time. I’ve got a reward for you. Primitives, a student game by seven final year-ers at the Queensland University of Technology, starts in a similar fashion – chop down a tree, make a campfire, get some stone, try not to eat your own face off in hunger. The twist comes when you start building huts, causing AI compatriots to arrive and turn the game into more of a third-person RTS. It’s also totally free and available in a beta state now. Trailer and some thoughts below.

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Freeware Garden: HHH

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 23rd, 2014.

Hugo’s House of Horrors, the parser driven shareware adventure game I played back during the dark days of the 5.25″ floppy, was a demented and, many would argue, nonsensical game. It did have a charming, odd, b-movie feel to it, but it played like a drunken person’s Maniac Mansion. For some weird reason though, and despite forcing me to smash a pumpkin just to grab a key, I still fondly remember it.

Now, appearances aside, the freshly crafted HHH is neither a new installment to the Hugo’s House of Horrors series nor a straight up remake, though it does use the original’s all-over-the-place EGA graphics. Also, it’s very very clever.

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Hit After Kickstarter Backing So It Can Be Free

By John Walker on October 22nd, 2014.

Well, it’s about time someone created a videogame of Murder In The Dark. Which seems a fair comparison for The Hit Team’s Kickstarted project, Hit. As Alice pointed out a few weeks back, it’s an eight-player multiplayer game, in which you work together as a team trying to complete certain tasks, while one of your number is secretly trying to sabotage your efforts. And best of all, if they can raise the small target to get the licenses they need, they plan to release the game for free.

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Have You Played… Notrium?

By Adam Smith on October 22nd, 2014.

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game recommendations. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

The RPS archives don’t contain a single post dedicated to Notrium and Survival Week is the perfect time to remedy that. Mod-friendly, free to download and rocking a randomised alien world before ‘procedural generation’ became the buzzword de jour, Ville Mönkkönen’s top-down sci-fi treat is still an unusual experience, even if I do sometimes feel that half of the game developers in the world have been secretly taking notes from it.

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Freeware Garden: The Deepest Sleep

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 22nd, 2014.

A not particularly spooky door and a pointer.

The Deepest Sleep is a first person, horror point-and-click adventure; the last installment in a trilogy of adventures involving sleeping rather deeply. Happily, never having played its two prequels didn’t spoil my enjoyment. The Deepest Sleep has you diving deep into your nightmares and fighting to find a way out, while avoiding the scary creatures that want you to never wake up again.

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Dinn Roamin’: Papers Please Dev’s New Game Has A Demo

By Alec Meer on October 22nd, 2014.

eat a sandwich, man

This is a pleasant surprise: Lucas Pope, he of the wildly acclaimed, extremely well-observed and reliably gut-wrenching Papers, Please, has snuck out a free demo of his next game. First person sort-of-adventure Return of the Obra Dinn has a somehow both retro and hyper-modern 1-bit art style (which looks a bit like a dot matrix printer was fed green paper), and concerns a Marie Celeste-style naval mystery. It’s TBC whether this too will make one lose all faith in humanity.
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Chyrza: A Short Night Vale-ish Horror Story

By Philippa Warr on October 21st, 2014.

Seems like a lovely spot for a picnic

If you’re in the mood for an atmospheric short story I’m going to suggest you point your personal computer towards Chyrza and click all the buttons necessary to download and play it.

Developer Kitty Horrorshow refers to it as a first-person flash-fiction horror story. What you’ll find is an abandoned desert village near a mysterious pyramid. Around the edges of the village you’ll see mysterious platforms and pillars to explore, each containing a trigger for the next part of the story.

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Freeware garden: Hellscapes 7-8

By Konstantinos Dimopoulos on October 21st, 2014.

I have apparently escaped from the Organaut Inquisition, emerged from the Transdimensional Meat Escalator and into a hellish and absurd glitch RPG: Hellscapes 7-8. I’m nothing more than a Salary Man with an esoteric rifle, an urge to survive and a demented determination to explore. 

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Ready, Steady, Poe: The Last Door

By Adam Smith on October 21st, 2014.

The Last Door is a neat point and click horror game that flirts with Lovecraftian cosmic horror but is in a long-term relationship with the weird fiction of Edgar Allan Poe. Released episodically, it has just entered its second season, following a four chapter debut, and despite a couple of logical leaps in the puzzle department, it’s well worth playing. The price helps with the recommendation – the first season is free. Episode one of season two will be free in the future as well but is currently available to backers, in beta form. Trailer below.

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