Posts Tagged ‘adventure’

Wot I Think: corporate espionage adventure The Low Road

Who hasn’t dreamed of the exciting world of corporate espionage? The Low Road [official site] is an adventure about business spying in the 1970s, but does it survive inspection under a magnifying glass? Here’s wot I think: Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: Rakuen

Composer, performer and now developer Laura Shigihara’s first game, Rakuen [official site], is out now, and it is something truly special. In a To The Moon sort of way. A hilarious and heartbreaking tale of loss and redemption, with songs. Here’s wot I think: Read the rest of this entry »

Everything wrong with the first three minutes of Thimbleweed Park

My very first interaction in Thimbleweed Park [official site], and most likely anyone else’s, was to “Look at Willie.” I don’t know who I’m playing yet, nor who Willie might be, but my German accented chap has appeared on a screen with two interactive items: a gate, and a slumped drunken man called Willie. So I looked at him, he being potentially more interesting than a gate, presuming that my character would inform me that either he knew this man and needed to speak to him, or that he did not. I got neither. Because “Look at Willie” speaks to him. Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: Survival meets adventure in Kôna

Survival-meets-adventure Kôna [official site] feels like a game that admirably comes in the wake of Campo Santo’s wilderness wonder Firewatch. But it’s worth noting the Kickstarter for the game launched years before Firewatch released. Still, I suspect lessons have been learned and added in the last year, and they’re very welcome, as this proves to be a fascinating game. Read the rest of this entry »

Kathy Rain developer announces Whispers of a Machine

Kathy Rain developer Joel Staaf Hästö has announced his next game, Whispers of a Machine [official site]. It’s a collaboration with The Samaritan Paradox developer Petter Ljungqvist. A traditional hand-painted point-and-click adventure, this time a murder mystery set in a world years after AI was destroyed to prevent the singularity. Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: OneShot

I’ve never played a game like OneShot [official site]. I’ve played rather a lot of games, too. It’s also been a really long time since I’ve cared about a game’s main character quite so much, to the point where decisions really mattered to me. Which is rather a lot to say of a game made in RPGMaker. But then this is a game that does stuff with that cutesy engine that I would never have thought possible. It does stuff with my PC that I didn’t know games could do. This is quite the thing. Here’s wot I think: Read the rest of this entry »

OneShot is bursting with nice ideas, and out now

Steam, you may have noticed, is a little bit broken. One of its multifarious idiosyncrasies is to include games that absolutely have not been released in its full list of released games. Every now and then I’ll spot a game that looks worth a peek, go to install it, and find it doesn’t even have a release date yet. So I tend to stick them on my wishlist and forget they exist. One such game that just popped up in my email as now released is OneShot [official site]. I don’t even have half a recollection of ever marking it, but gosh I’m glad I did. I’ve been playing it this morning and this top-down meta pixel adventure is completely charming. Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: The Bunker

Somewhere there exists a line that marks the point where FMV releases switch between clicking on a film to make it keep playing, and being a meaningful game. The Bunker [official site] is way, way over to the left of that line – it can barely be bothered to ask you to click. Here’s wot I think:

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Wot I Think: Sorcery! Part 4

With Part 4, Inkle’s triumphant Sorcery! series [official site] reaches its conclusion. It’s still sourcing its core tale from the Steve Jackson classics, but having taken wonderful leaps away to include its own far more elaborate possibilities. And the trajectory of each game being better than the last is not broken in this fourth release, the best yet, and indeed one I now feel comfortable calling one of the finest RPGs ever made. This is spectacular. Here’s wot I think:

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The RPG Scrollbars: Warcraft: Lord Of The Clans

Way back in the 90s, Blizzard infamously planned to expand its Warcraft strategy game universe by jumping into adventures. Ever since then, Warcraft: Lord Of The Clans has been one of the PC’s more famous ‘lost’ games – one of the few known to be almost complete at the point of cancellation rather than just existing as a tech demo and a few screenshots. It was canned in 1998, with Blizzard turning down a petition to finish the job from fans back in the day when not every single blasted action or inaction spawned those.

And then last week, the whole thing finally leaked online.

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Wot I Think: Kelvin And The Infamous Machine

We live in peculiar times, and so it is that I’ve really already reviewed charming adventure game Kelvin And The Infamous Machine [official site], but back when it was in Early Access. So rather than write the whole thing out again, I’ve popped the original review below, with new post-release thoughts at the bottom. TL:DR: they added great voice acting.

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Impressions: Sherlock Holmes – The Devil’s Daughter

Frogwares’ Sherlock Holmes games have always been very weird. From the early awful fan-fiction-like conflations of Doyle’s work with his contemporaries, complete with evil staring Watson, to the more recent third-person festivals of terribleness, they’ve not managed to be good, but they’ve certainly managed to be strange. And yup, that’s not changing here. The Devil’s Daughter [official site] is like a fever dream, but a fever dream that’s been really badly made. Here’s my impressions of the first half, because good grief.

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Wot I Think: Kathy Rain

Kathy Rain [official site] is the first adventure from Clifftop Games (Joel Staaf Hästö), the story of a journalism student investigating the strange circumstances of the last few years of her grandfather’s life. I previewed it last month and was really impressed. Will that continue for the full game? Here’s wot I think:

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Kathy Rain Falls In Two Weeks, Showers Us With Hope

Kathy Rain [official site], one of the smartest-looking AGS adventures that doesn’t have the words “Wadjet Eye” on the digital box, is due out in but a couple of weeks – 5th May. And having played a bunch of scenes in a preview build, I’ve decided to twist dials and flick switches until my brain is set to: Very Interested. You might want to too.

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Wot I Think: Samorost 3

From the team most famous for Machinarium, Aminita Design, comes the third game in the Samorost series. Don’t worry if you’ve never heard of the first two – they were both tiny Flash games. Samorost 3 [official site] is a full-length, full-screen adventure that requires no prior knowledge. How does the adventure/puzzle game hold up at this scale? Here’s wot I think:

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Wot I Think: Nelly Cootalot – The Fowl Fleet

As adventure games come tumbling upon us, and for once it’s a pleasure, Nelly Cootalot: The Fowl Fleet [official site] finds itself in good company. And it’s a pleasure to report that despite its smaller budget and much smaller team, it merits that company. A sweet, silly and welcoming adventure game in which your ultimate goal is rescuing some poor wee birdies. Here’s wot I think:

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Wot I Think: Day Of The Tentacle Remastered

It’s frightening to realise that Day Of The Tentacle Remastered [official site] is a reworking of a game that’s been in my top five games since I first played it, a whopping 23 years ago. And a game that for the better part of the last decade, has been near impossible to buy or play. With Double Fine’s Remaster updating or restoring its graphics, music and sound, at the very minimum what we have here is a purchasable, playable version of the original game. On top of that, you can now play it in wide- and full-screen, with a smartly reimagined interface, much improved music, and the voices crystal clear without all the hissing and bubbly weirdness that affected the original CD-ROM version of the game. Which is to say, if anyone doesn’t like any of the changes they’ve made, they can switch them off and they’ve absolutely nothing to complain about. Which is neat. Here’s wot I think:

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Hands On: Nelly Cootalot – The Fowl Fleet

RPS had barely gotten started when free point-and-click adventure Nelly Cootalot: Spoonbeaks Ahoy appeared in 2007. I adored it, and it appeared in our first ever advent calendar. So in 2013, when a Kickstarter was announced to fund a full-length sequel, Nelly Cootalot: The Fowl Fleet [official site], we demanded you fund it. You did, and with additional funding from snazzily named publishers Application Systems, the game is coming out on the 22nd. Yesterday I sat down in a Starbucks with creator Alasdair Beckett-King and had a play.

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Early Access Preview: Kelvin And The Infamous Machine

After somewhat less pleasant adventure experiences of late, it’s rather lovely to encounter a simple but sweet point-and-click that is neither focused on stupidity nor cruelty. But rather time travelling silliness, saving the world from a mad scientist hell-bent on claiming the credit for the great works of geniuses past. After a successful modest Kickstarter, developers Blyts’ Kelvin And The Infamous Machine [official site] is out on Early Access today, complete but for voice acting and final bug testing. I’ve played it through.

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Wot I Think: Shardlight

The latest adventure from top producers Wadjet Eye, Shardlight [official site], is out today. When I played the first half or so earlier this year I was pretty taken with what was on offer. Does the post-apocalyptic tale of oligarchies, underground rebellions and deadly plagues manage to maintain momentum? Here’s wot I think:

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