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Don't worry, Beyond Good & Evil 2 has survived Ubisoft's recent game cull

14 years and counting

It's been 14 years since RPS started writing about Beyond Good & Evil 2, Ubisoft's open world follow up to the cult classic I'm too young to have played. We haven't seen hide nor genetically modified pig tail of it since 2018, but rest assured, it lives.

That's despite the most recent swing of Ubisoft's game-cancelling scythe, which was brought down on three unannounced games last week due to the company's underperforming sales.

Cover image for YouTube video

Ubisoft confirmed that yep, they're still working on it in a statment they gave today to PCGames N. "Beyond Good and Evil 2’s development is underway and the team is hard at work to deliver on its ambitious promise”, they said. Grand.

It's been a funny old ride. We knew very little about Good & Evil 2 for ages, then we found at loads, thanks to the trailer above. "You play as a customisable space pirate captain who carries a sword, a gun and a jetpack as basic equipment", says the man from the distant past. Hoverbiking around that sci-fi city looks cool, but also very... 2018.

After four years, who knows how much of what they showed back then has survived. We do know BG&E creator Michel Ancel retired from the industry in 2020, to go work with real animals rather than space hybrids.

There's a Netflix movie coming, too, from the guy who directed detective Pikachu. I wonder which we'll see first.

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Beyond Good and Evil 2

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About the Author
Matt Cox avatar

Matt Cox

Former Staff Writer

Once the leader of Rock Paper Shotgun's Youth Contingent, Matt is an expert in multiplayer games, deckbuilders and battle royales. He occasionally pops back into the Treehouse to write some news for us from time to time, but he mostly spends his days teaching small children how to speak different languages in warmer climates.

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