Posts Tagged ‘free’

Pathologic remake demo now available to all, for free

a demo, you say?

When you woke up this morning, you probably didn’t realise what a joyous day this truly is. This is the day of bewilderment and wonder, of mystery, mirth and miasma. This is the day of Pathologic [official site].

The new version of Ice-Pick Lodge’s absurdist theatrical masterpiece won’t be ready for release until Autumn but you can download a new build of the two hour Marble Nest demo, which was released to backers late last year. It’s now free to everyone, in a new build, which you can download via Steam. I’ve played the previous build and it is everything I ever wanted from Pathologic: weird, unnerving, amusing and fantastically clever. It’s the most delicious poison of all.

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Oh my goodness, I completely love Raft

Browsing Itch.io the other day, as is my wont, I couldn’t help but be reminded about Raft [Itch.io site]. Brendan previously spotted it, and I forgot to grab it then. Proving rather popular on the platform since its launch in December, the shots immediately reminded me of my old love, Salt. But this is even more specific than that stripped down of survival sims. This is stripped to a single raft, endlessly bobbing through the sea. And I’ve loved it! Read the rest of this entry »

Takume is a five minute parable with beautiful pixel art

One of the finest strengths of the tiny game is their potential to evoke the narrative structures of fables, parables or fairy tales. The larger the game, the more explicit plots tend to get, with a player’s patience for ambiguity or esotericism stretched too far over multiple hours. But when a game last five or ten minutes there’s, ironically, more room to be vague, elusive, and open to interpretation.

Takume [official site] by Death Trash developer Stephan Hövelbrinks is a fine example of this realised, a five minute game rendered in beautifully animated chunky pixels, a fable of two sisters. Read the rest of this entry »

Wot I Think: Tiles & Tales – A ‘free’ game that forgets to cost money

Free to play is obviously an effective model on mobile, as despised as it may be. ‘Free’ games don’t get world-famous Hollywood stars to appear in their commercials if they’re not raking it in. It’s clearly here to stay while companies get millions and millions of dollars from it. And, of course, no one is obliged to play them. (My opinions get a lot more specific when such pay-to-play aspects are hardwired into games aimed at kids, but that’s another day’s discussion.) However, there’s another aspect to these games that I don’t think gets talked about so much: that bizarre tension of playing one, hearing the ticking countdown of when it’ll stop being fun and start wanting your cash.

That’s very much the case with Tiles & Tales [official site], a nice, simple puzzle-RPG that is so clearly intended for mobile that the PC version is in portrait. That outrageously lazy porting aside, it hasn’t gone through the transition that many such games make for their Steam release, and has remained “free”. Albeit with the option to start spending ridiculous amounts of money from the off. It’s just… you don’t need to. Here’s wot I think. Read the rest of this entry »

Have You Played… RetroArch?

Have You Played? is an endless stream of game retrospectives. One a day, every day of the year, perhaps for all time.

Hey, you know all those old console cartridges you have all the originals of and painstakingly took ROM backups up yourself? Turns out there’s a way to use ’em. Who knew?
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The World before time: original WoW, revisited

Last year, I tried to indulge my nostalgia for Dun Morogh, the wintry original Dwarf & Gnome starting zone in World of Warcraft, by returning to it as it is now. It did not go entirely well – in the 11 years since WoW’s launch, much has changed. Where once this was a slow-starting MMO, defined by long wandering, hard work and a certain degree of solitude, these days its early questing is an explosion of instantaneous rewards and high-speed levelling. I thought that this first World of Warcraft was lost forever. But there is a way back.
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