Posts Tagged ‘Vlambeer’

Nuclear Throne’s Vlambeer: “If The Customer Was Always Right I Wouldn’t Have A Job”

When I meet Vlambeer’s Rami Ismail, it’s in the middle of the annual Develop conference in Brighton. He’s a striking figure in a sea that’s half middle-aged businessmen and half wide-eyed, unshaven young developers in t-shirts: improbably tall, wearing a leather jacket on a hot summer’s day, hair everywhere, and a mile-a-minute patter that conveys extreme confidence without evident arrogance. He’s nearing the end of Ramadan, which means he hasn’t eaten during the day for several weeks, but has the energy and enthusiasm of someone about to climb Everest. Like his company’s offbeat action games and his often highly outspoken social media style or not, it is little surprise that this guy became so successful – though of course the raw, joyful appeal of games including Nuclear Throne, Super Crate Box, Luftrausers and Ridiculous Fishing went a long way towards that.

But would the confidence and conviction that he has when he wades headlong into the gaming issues of the day or, as he does in his keynote Develop speech the next day, declare that listening to one’s customers is not necessarily the best policy, be there if he didn’t already have the safety net of that success? In the unedited transcript below, we talk about that, about his feelings towards his own customers, indie ‘luck’, why games want rockstars, Ubisoft’s women characters controversy and why he doesn’t feel he can tell anyone else how to be successful.
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Cheaty Tennis For More Than Two: Tennnes

The extra N is for all the times you'll cry 'Nnnoooo!'

A very cool and exciting thing happened in indie games in 2011. Unfortunately for most, it was largely confined to far-away events, people’s friend’s houses, pubs, bars, and other dark rooms. Oh, but what wonderful games the local multiplayer minimalist sports game craze brought! Hokra, Tennnes, and others inspired by these that I saw in aforementioned dark rooms, demoed on laptops and shown in videos on phones, and whose names I’ve forgotten. Some are finally coming to light.

Minimalist arcade tennis Tennnes launched for the hoi polloi yesterday, with a pricing model as quirky as its fondness for N. It costs $20 (£12.50), but you’re allowed to give it to yer pals for free.

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Vlambeer’s Luftrausers Finally (Crash) Landing In March

THOOM is the noise that gun would make. I just know it is.

In case you weren’t aware, Vlambeer makes games. Other developers make games, but they don’t make games. This is an important distinction, because it involves letters being slanted and slanted letters are sacred. For real, though, the two-headed fire bear of a developer churns out chunkily satisfying experiences at an almost alarming rate, so it’s kind of surprising that arcade-y airplaner Luftrausers isn’t already dive-bombing our machines. The bigger, better, even more a-rauser-ing edition was announced nearly two years ago, for goodness’ sake. That’s, like, three or three-and-a-half years in Vlambeer time (see: Nuclear Throne, Ridiculous Fishing, multiple free games, etc)! But now, finally, mercifully, Luftrausers is on the horizon.

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Ninja Edit: Vlambeer Clone Tycoon

Vlambeer’s Ridiculous Fishing has been a deserved success but while its precursor Radical Fishing was still in development, a game called Ninja Fishing appeared on the Appstore, which cloned Vlambeer’s structure, replacing fish-blasting with Fruit Ninja’s slicing. To commemorate that moment and (presumably) to coincide with the Android release of Ridiculous, Rik Nieuwdorp and Martijn Frazer have created Vlambeer Clone Tycoon, a browser game about monitoring gaming websites to look for new ideas to copy and sell.

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I Wrote Some Beat Poetry About Nuclear Throne…

Stay awhile and listen

…because I was struggling to find a way to discuss a game that’s so, uh… Well, perhaps you see my problem.

I’ve also included a video of myself experiencing a particularly pathetic death. Perhaps it’s a clue that you shouldn’t take any of this seriously.
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