Posts Tagged ‘graphics cards’

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti review: A 4K monster that isn’t worth the extra cash

Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080Ti

As muscular as the GTX 1080 is, there have been some not-entirely-unwarranted grumbles about its underlying tech; specifically, that it’s basically a GTX 1070 with more of the GPU’s cores enabled. The GTX 1080Ti is much bigger break from the rest of Nvidia’s 10-series, and a much more overtly ‘high-end’ card. It uses the bigger, beefier GP-102 GPU, same as in the bonkers-expensive Titan X and Titan Xp, and wields 3584 processing cores to the GTX 1080’s 2560. Its 11GB of memory is the most you’ll find in a mainstream card, too.

Obviously, these upgrades will put a proportionally larger dent into your finances. The MSI GeForce GTX 1080Ti Gaming X Trio I’ve been testing – with its factory overclocking and custom triple-fan cooler – is £750, and generally the cheapest GTX 1080Ti I can find still asks for £698. With the GTX 1080 dropping as low as £500, this card needs to prove it’s not just a list of fancy-sounding specs.

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Cyber Monday 2017: The best deals on PC games, graphics cards, monitors, SSDs and more

Cyber Monday 2017

After a weekend of gorging yourself on turkey and elbowing people in the face to get that last discounted something or other in the shops, now it’s time to settle in and continue those deal hunts from the comfort of your own home. For today is Cyber Monday, the day that’s reserved for purely online-only deals following the shopping bonanza that was Black Friday.

This year, we’ve done the hard work for you, as we’ve scoured the web for the best Cyber Monday deals money can buy. These aren’t just re-heated Black Friday deals, either, as most retailers usually have completely separate discounts running today, making it a great time to pick up another bargain if none of the deals last week took your fancy. As always, we’ll be updating this article throughout the day, so make sure to check back at regular intervals just in case something new appears. We’ve also got tips on the best places to browse, and how to find out if those hot discounts are really as good as they seem.

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Black Friday 2017: Best graphics card deals

You can’t seem to go three days in November without some big, new AAA game being released, so if your PC’s been struggling to play the likes of Assassin’s Creed Origins, Nioh, Wolfenstein II or Middle-earth: Shadow of War recently, you’re in luck. For Black Friday is precisely the time of year when graphics card prices plummet and you can nab yourself a bit of a bargain.

 

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Black Friday 2017: The best deals on graphics cards, monitors, SSDs and more

1080ti

The sale event to end all sale events is here. That’s right, folks, Black Friday 2017 is here, and this year’s sales frenzy is set to be bigger than ever as we head into the Christmas shopping period. In all honesty, they should just rename it Black November, as there have been deals going on throughout the month in preparation for the big day.

To save you trawling through the web in search of a good bargain, we’ve created this handy guide containing everything you need to know about Black Friday 2017. If you’re on the hunt for a new graphics card, a bigger and better monitor, want to splash out on a fast SSD or upgrade your gaming headset and get a more reliable mouse and keyboard, this is the place to be. We’ll be updating this hub page on a regular basis as new deals get announced, too, so make sure to keep it in your bookmarks if you fancy grabbing yourself a bit of a bargain before Christmas. We’ve also got tips on the best places to browse, and how to find out if those hot discounts are really as good as they seem.

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Best graphics cards 2017 for 1080p, 1440p and 4K gaming

Best graphics cards 2017

There are almost too many top graphics cards to choose from, which is why this here article is all about identifying the single best GPU you can get for playing games at 1080p, 1440p and 4K. Read on for advice on what to pick and how to pick your next graphics card. Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Radeon RX 580 review: Our top pick for 1440p gaming

AMD RX 580

Now that the RX 580, AMD’s patriarch of the Polaris architecture family, is finally back in stock and at reasonable prices, it’s time to reconsider its viability as the centrepiece of a mid-range build. For those unaware, the RX 580 comes in both 4GB and 8GB VRAM flavours. I’m covering the latter here, and it’s hard to make an argument as to why you’d consider the former: it’s not that much cheaper, but does essentially cut you off from the flashiest graphical stuff (like Ultra-high quality textures) in games which support them. Having less memory can also generally scupper you when running with higher resolutions, and considering that the RX 580 appears to have been made with 1440p firmly in AMD’s collective mind, 8GB just makes more sense.

Once again, it’s an Asus ROG Strix OC Edition I’m testing, though since the overclock in question has such a tiny boost speed upgrade from 1340MHz to a maximum of 1380MHz, it should be representative of most partner-made RX 580s. This costs £330, which is a lot considering MSI, Gigabyte and XFX all have alternative models for around £280 or less. Here, however, you do get three fans, a sturdy backplate and an extra HDMI port for VR kit for your trouble.

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AMD Radeon RX 570 review: An all-round 1080p card

AMD RX 570

Back during the Great Mining Drought of a couple of months ago-ish, the RX 570 looked like the saving grace of AMD’s ludicrously price-inflated Radeon lineup. Admittedly, this was mainly due to the 8GB RX 580 being hurled violently though the £300 barrier, but even with fewer ‘stream processors’ (i.e. cores) and just 4GB of memory, the RX 570 was offering another FreeSync-enabled, 1080p/1440p alternative at a much, much lower price.

Now that the whole cryptocurrency thing has (mostly) died down, however, the RX 580 is in a much better position to not just resume its jostling with Nvidia’s GTX 1060 for mid-range supremacy, but also to relegate the RX 570 back to the status of an awkward middle child: not powerful enough to consider over these other two cards (4K, for instance, is beyond it), and too expensive to consider over budget alternatives like the RX 560 and GTX 1050 Ti. Can the RX 570 still justify itself?

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AMD Radeon Vega RX 64 review: finally some competition for the GTX 1080

Asus Vega RX 64

Just as the Radeon Vega RX 56 targets Nvidia’s GTX 1070, the Vega RX 64 is AMD’s precision strike on the mighty GTX 1080. About damn time, too – by focusing solely on the mid-range and entry-level RX 400 and RX 500 series, AMD has given Nvidia free reign of the premium market for about two years. Time for some competition, methinks.

The model I’m testing is Asus’ ROG Strix version, or to use its full title for the only time in this review, the Asus ROG Strix RX Vega 64 OC Edition. The poetically-named ARSRV64OCE builds on AMD’s tech – which includes 8GB of High Bandwidth Memory 2 (HBM2), which stacks its memory modules units on top of each other, supposedly speeding up how long it takes to talk to your CPU – with a nifty three-fan air cooler and, as the name suggests, overclocked cores. It’s only a little bump, mind, upping the base clock from 1247MHz to 1298MHz and the boost clock from 1549MHz to 1590MHz. As to whether all that makes the RX 64 as capable as the GTX 1080 at 1440p and, perhaps most importantly, 4K, the answer is: yes! Pretty much!

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070Ti review: Better than the GTX 1080?

Between finding out the GTX 1070 Ti was a thing and actually getting my hands on one, I spent a lot of time trying, and failing, to determine where this 4K-bothering card sat in Nvidia’s overall strategy. Its position in the Nvidia hierarchy is obvious – between the GTX 1070 and the GTX 1080 – but other than sharing 8GB of memory, it seems to be more of a toned-down 1080 than a souped-up 1070. After all, it has far more cores than the GTX 1070 – 2,432 of them compared to the 1070’s 1,920 – but just 128 fewer cores than the (ostensibly) beefier GTX 1080. Why, then, would you not just take the tiny step further to a GTX 1080?

It gets weirder, too: Nvidia seems to have a strange rule against its partners setting their GTX 1070 Tis up with factory overclocks, meaning that you can only buy at stock speeds (1607 MHz base, 1683 MHz boost). Workarounds have already been found for this (overclocking isn’t outlawed per se), but it seems an awful lot like Nvidia’s scared of the 1070 Ti sapping GTX 1080 sales. That, or they just wanted to give a central digit to AMD’s Radeon Vega RX 56 by outperforming it with a less ‘important’ card. I dunno, basically. But to help cure my ignorance, I’ve got Zotac’s take, the GeForce GTX 1070Ti AMP Extreme.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1050Ti review: The best budget card under £200

When we last looked at AMD’s entry-level Radeon RX 460, I wasn’t too impressed, so can its nearly-but-not-actually competitor from Nvidia, the GeForce GTX 1050, do any better? Well, the answer to that is slightly muddled, as I’ve actually got the GeForce GTX 1050Ti – the 1050’s slicker, slightly more expensive sibling. So, can the Ti win where the 460 failed and deliver good-enough gaming at a budget price?

For starters, you’ll have to pay a lot more for a GTX 1050Ti than an RX 460, as the cheapest 1050Ti cards rock in at about £135 in Brexit tokens or about $160. This particular 1050Ti from MSI, meanwhile – the GeForce GTX 1050Ti Gaming X 4GB – really blows the budget at just under £160 in the UK and $180 in the US according to Newegg. This is getting on for an entry-level 3D board, even if you do get a little extra for your cash in the form of a factory overclock of around 8% over a standard 1050Ti and the promise of some additional overclocking headroom thanks to improved cooling and power supply.

Still, when your typical GTX 1050 costs around £120 / $130, the RX 460 (and its closely related successor, the RX 560) can be found cheaper still at around or just under £100 / $120, the GTX 1050Ti has a lot to prove to make it worth your time. Let’s see how it holds up, shall we? Read the rest of this entry »

AMD Radeon RX 480 review: Graphics greatness you can actually afford?

AMD’s pixel pumping Radeon RX 480 is slightly old hat now. Despite its close competitor, the Nvidia GeForce GTX 1060, being alive and well and readily available to buy, the RX 480 has all but disappeared from online retailers – unless you want to pay massively over the odds for one, of course. That’s largely because it’s now been replaced by the newer RX 580, which shares the same GPU / chipset / thingy as the RX 480, but comes with a slightly higher clock speed, allowing it to run just a teeny bit faster compared to its 480 predecessor.

That said, until we’ve taken a closer look at said RX 580 to find out just how much better it is, you can get a pretty good idea of what it’s like by reading my original thoughts on the RX 480. So how does it perform? Forget the benchmarks, let’s give the new RX 480 a good old grope.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1080 review: A big leap, but not quite a 4K slayer

Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1080 is no longer top dog in its GPU family – that honour now goes the GTX 1080Ti and, of course, the frankly ridiculous Titan Xp. It has, however, come down quite dramatically in price since I first looked at it, arguably making it a better buy than ever before if you’re after a 4K-capable graphics card. The economically monikered MSI Gaming X 8GB Twin Frozr VI pictured above, for instance, cost a wallet-breaking £695 a year ago. Now you can pick up one like Gigabyte’s equally succinct GeForce GTX 1080 Turbo OC for as little as £489 from Scan. Or, if you head over to our Black Friday 2017 hub, you can find one for just £439 over on Ebuyer. The 1080Ti, on the other hand, has remained at a steady £700 since launch.

A no-brainer, right? Not quite, as there’s also the GTX 1070Ti to think about as well, which costs even less at around £420 and promises near 1080 performance. We’ll be taking a look at the 1070Ti shortly, so we’ll update this page with our findings soon to let you know how we got on. For now, though, I’ll turn my attention back to the regular GTX 1080.

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Nvidia Geforce GTX 1060 review: The New 1440p King?

Welcome to part two of my leisurely stroll through the new GPU landscape. Last time around, it was the mighty Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080, which suddenly looks a lot less mighty thanks to the arrival of the Titan X. Today, however, we’re looking Nvidia’s new mid-range contender, the GTX 1060. As before, I shall be spurning objectivity, benchmarks and frame-rate counters for a what-does-it-actually-feel-like approach.

I call it a mid-range card, but it seems Nvidia is currently engaged in an attempt to realign the entire graphics market. The Titan X is $1,200 and the GTX 1080 is $600 (well, $700 for those ghastly ‘Founder’s Edition’ cards), but the GTX 1060 we’re dealing with today costs just $260/£250 – that is, if you’re looking at the 6GB version, of course, as since we tested the GTX 1060, Nvidia has also released a less powerful 3GB model.

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Nvidia GeForce GTX 1070 review: The 1440p Graphics Card Of Choice?

Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1070 neatly occupies what is normally my favoured slot in the overall hierarchy of any given GPU family, namely one rung down from the top graphics chip that’s actually bought in much more significant volumes. Except, Nvidia’s Pascal family isn’t entirely normal. We’ve already touched base with the GTX 1080 and the GTX 1060, and the GTX 1070 inevitably slots in between.

Things get even more complicated when you take the recently announced GTX 1070Ti into account, which nestles between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080. We’ve yet to test the 1070Ti, so it’s difficult to say exactly how it compares to the rest of Nvidia’s Pascal pack, but with prices currently hovering around the £420/$449 mark (and regular 1070 prices not that much lower), it could end up being a much better buy than its non-Ti counterpart, especially if you’re after a card that’s capable of super smooth 1,440p gaming. We’ll be updating this article with more thoughts on how the 1070 compares to the 1070Ti in the very near future, but for now, let’s focus on the 1070 proper. After all, when Nvidia claims it can outperform its £1,000 Titan X mega beast, that’s reason enough to sit up and take notice.

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Nvidia’s GTX 1070Ti is arriving next week for £420 / $449

Nvidia GTX 1070Ti

We all knew it was coming, but Nvidia have finally confirmed the GTX 1070Ti. Sitting roughly between the GTX 1070 and GTX 1080 in terms of specs and performance, the card will start shipping from November 2nd, with pre-orders open right now should you feel so inclined. It will set you back a fair chunk of change, costing upwards of £420 / $449 depending on which manufacturer design you go for, but with Nvidia’s next-gen Volta cards still seemingly a long way off and many regular GTX 1070 cards still priced in a similar kind of ball park, the GTX 1070Ti might be the card for you if you want something to rival AMD’s brand-new Vega cards. Read the rest of this entry »

Why Nvidia is overcharging us all off, just a bit

As I was saying, Intel’s CPU strategy has gone into meltdown. As a consequence, the cynicism of its approach in the face of weak competition – right up until AMD pulled its new Ryzen out of the proverbial – has been laid bare. But it’s not just Chipzilla that’s worthy of your scorn. For some time now, Nvidia has essentially been ripping us all off just a little bit. Here’s why. Read the rest of this entry »

Nvidia’s new $700 1080 Ti in theory beats $1200 Titan X

With Nvidia‘s long dominance of the top end of the graphics card market potentially under threat from AMD’s upcoming RX Vega line, they’ve just offered a speculative riposte. The Nvidia GTX 1080 Ti is a buffed-up take on the year-old 1080, and though conventional wisdom (i.e. Nvidia naming traditions) would place it between that card and their $1200 Titan X, the claim is that their $700 new’un actually beats the X.

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Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1050Ti: Affordable Graphics That’s Actually Gaming-Worthy?

Last time, we had a sniff around AMD’s latest entry-level pixel pumper, the Radeon RX 460. It was not impressive. This week, it’s time for the 460’s nearly-but-not-actually competitor from Nvidia, the GeForce GTX 1050. Except I’ve actually got the 1050Ti, which is in turn the 1050’s slicker, slightly more expensive sibling. So, can the Ti win where the 460 failed and deliver good-enough gaming at an affordable price? Read the rest of this entry »

AMD’s New Radeon RX 480: Graphics Greatness You Can Actually Afford?

As promised, the 2016 GPUgasm continues and not a moment too soon we come to AMD’s new pixel pumper, the Radeon RX 480, otherwise known as Polaris. With Nvidia’s new graphics chipsets delivering excellent performance but at punitive pricing, the narrative I’m unashamedly desperate to deliver involves AMD to the rescue with something very nearly as good, just for a fraction of the cost. With the new RX 480 clocking in at around £200 / $200, the money part of the package looks promising. But what about the performance? Forget the benchmarks, let’s give the new RX 480 a good old grope.

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Nvidia’s Geforce GTX 1060: The New 1440p King?

The graphics launches have come thick and fast this year. What with GTXs and then the surprise Titan X from Nvidia, and AMD’s Polaris chips, there’s little chance of keeping up with the official embargo calendar. So think of this as part two of my leisurely stroll through the new GPU landscape. Last time around, it was the mighty Nvidia Geforce GTX 1080, which suddenly looks a lot less mighty thanks to the arrival of the aforementioned Titan X. This week, it’s the turn of Nvidia’s new mid-range contender, the GTX 1060. As before, I shall be spurning objectivity, benchmarks and frame-rate counters for a what-does-it-actually-feel-like approach. And yes, AMD coverage will follow in the fullness of time. Patience, Iago!

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